Electric Out on One Side of House ????

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Jon4, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. Jon4

    Jon4 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    When it rains it pours...now the circuit that my refrigerator is connected to went out. I had a large Foreman grill and coffee pot on the same circuit going at the same time.

    I went to the breaker box figuring that the surge turned off the switch, but not the case. I went outside to check the box by the meter and there's just one main switch.

    I turned off then on the effected circuit, but still no power.

    I should add that there are about seven outlets on this circuit, says '20.'

    The previous owner replaced the breaker box before moving because the entire electrical system had gone out.

    Any ideas what the problem may be? :confused: Is there any way to reset it??

    Thanks.
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  2. 480sparky

    480sparky In the Trades

    Messages:
    149
    Exactly what all is out? You say one side of house, but only 7 outlets.

    If half your house is out, the problem is in the main service and is best left to a pro.

    If it's just one kitchen circuit, it could be a tripped GFI receptacle.
  3. Jon4

    Jon4 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Hello sparky---Actually, it's just a section of the across the kitchen through the dining room. All other receptacles work. Where might I locate the GFI receptacle?? Thanks.


    EDIT: I LOCATED THE GFI, PUSHED THE BUTTON, EVERYTHING IS BACK UP AND RUNNING! Thanks sparky for bringing that to my attention!!! (Give this man a beer, several!...on me!)
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Gfci

    I would never plug a refrigerator or freezer into a GFCI protected outlet. It could false trip, or even trip normally, when you are gone and everything will spoil before you find out about it.
  5. 480sparky

    480sparky In the Trades

    Messages:
    149
    He may not have a choice if the fridge recep is on the load side of the GFI.

    Yes, he can redo it, but it can get complicated.
  6. Jon4

    Jon4 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    The GFI outlet is used for the microwave. The only two outlets close enough to be reached by the fridge plug are on the same circuit.

    Um..."load side of the GFI?" :confused:

    Do you recommend putting the fridge outlet on a single circuit?
  7. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

    Messages:
    996
    Location:
    NY State, USA
    When given the choice? Always.
  8. 480sparky

    480sparky In the Trades

    Messages:
    149
    I didn't know they were both plugged into the same GFI receptacle. "Load side" of the GFI means protecting other receptacles from the 'load side' of a GFI. This is done with the wiring in the wall.

    It's not necessary the fridge be on it's own circuit, but that would be ideal. And preferably not on a GFI.
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,134
    Location:
    New England
    Many gfci outlets can protect more than one outlet. They have two pairs of power connections - line (the incoming power which powers that outlet), and the load (a set of leads that can daisy chain to additional outlets). ANy outlets on the load side of a gfci are protected as if you connected them directly into the gfci.

    This can give you grief if you forget and suddenly something doesn't work. You go to the circuit breaker and it is on. If this ever happens, always look around for a gfci - it could be in another room as easily as right next to yours.
  10. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    FYI Jon, if you own a doublewide, one half of the trailer probably "plugs in" to the other half. Thus, if you ever really do lose power to one entire side of the trailer, the problem is usually in the connection between the two halves. Like the plumbing, this electrical connection is usually located under the home and can be a pain to get to.
  11. Jon4

    Jon4 New Member

    Messages:
    7

    Ah, okay, got it. Thanks for all the tips, I really appreciate it guys. Have a great holiday.
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Gfci

    Removing the refrigerator from the GFCI's load side can be as simple as moving the wire to the feed side. If there are intermediate outlets between that and the reefer, they can be changed to individual GFCI's, (which I prefer anyway compared to daisy chained ones), and/or any after the reefer can be controlled by their own GFCI and load wiring.
  13. kd

    kd New Member

    Messages:
    207
    I think HJ means moving the "wires" to the line or power feed side of the GFCI. That is both the hot and white wire can be tapped into to feed unprotected power to the refrig. receptacle, then a GFCI added to protect downstream outlets.
  14. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    I think all that "reefer" must have clouded his thinking. ;)
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