Distance From Rim Of Toilet To Obstruction - Does That Include The Arc Of The Door?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Code Questions' started by Bluegrass Picker, Jan 21, 2014.

  1. Bluegrass Picker

    Bluegrass Picker New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hi,

    I'm still in the planning stages of our bathroom remodel and I'm trying to make everything conform to code before we begin.

    Code requires that from the front rim of the toilet, a space of at least 24" to the nearest obstruction must be kept.

    The 24" door to this bathroom is in the left side wall (as you sit), and the left hand door edge is 33" from the rear wall. The door swings inward to the bathroom starting from the left, sweeping in an arc in front of the projected toilet rim.

    When the door is closed or fully open, there is much more than 24" of distance to the toilet rim. However, when the door is in the closest part of its swinging arc when in the process of opening or closing, it will be around ten inches from the rim.

    Is this a violation of code, or do they count the distance either opened or closed?

    Thanks in advance for any help. It is very much appreciated.

    Bluegrass Picker

    Additional: I should have mentioned that a pocket door is not an option.

    Here's a drawing of the part in question:

    toilet.jpg
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  2. dhagin

    dhagin builder:anti-builder

    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    oahu
    No. :)
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  3. Bluegrass Picker

    Bluegrass Picker New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Washington State
    Thank you very much for your response. I appreciate it. (Sorry for my late reply). Kinda hectic around here these days......

    We are proceeding with our plans, and I have one more question, please.

    In order to fit a sink between the 32" shower stall and the toilet while maintaining the proper code distances between the fixtures and wall, it looks like I'll have to put in a wall hung sink or a pedestal sink and not a vanity as pictured originally.

    My understanding is that I have to put the edge of the sink 4" away from the shower stall wall (the brown colored wall between the sink and the shower stall in the attached drawing) and that the center line of the sink must be 15" from that wall. It looks like I can barely use a 20" sink in that location if I make the wall 2" thick. I can do that if I turn 2x4's flat with 1/2" sheetrock on the sink side of the wall. Since that wall is only going to project out 17", I'll use three 2x4's turned flat with 2x4 blocking in the middle for strength and I might even screw some steel flat bar along one of the 1 1/2" edges of each 2x4 for strength. The shower stall will be fastened to the other side as per the mfgr. instructions.

    The question is: Is there anything in the building code that prevents a small non-load bearing wall such as this from being 2" thick made in the manner as described above? Would it probably pass the building inspector's review?

    Thanks very much.

    upstairs bathroom 32 shower with Tub- Wall SinkText-Dimensions-1.jpg
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,802
    Location:
    New England
  5. Bluegrass Picker

    Bluegrass Picker New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Washington State
    Thanks for your reply.

    That looks like a very interesting way to go, and if we should decide to tile the shower we'll look very closely at that.

    Our plan was to use a Mustee 32" shower base with Mustee 32x72 inch 3-piece molded walls. At least that's the plan to begin with. My mind is wide open for change if tiling or any other options are cost effective or necessary to make the clearances work for code purposes, etc. in such a tight space as we are working with.

    Thanks again.

    Bluegrass Picker
  6. dhagin

    dhagin builder:anti-builder

    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    oahu
    "My understanding is that I have to put the edge of the sink 4" away from the shower stall wall (the brown colored wall between the sink and the shower stall in the attached drawing) and that the center line of the sink must be 15" from that wall."

    I'm goin from memory, so try to confirm with your local code official or another pro - but, I believe there's no minimum requirements for vanities or sinks in residential bathrooms. As long as you don't encroach into the 30" toilet space or the interior of the shower, you can make the vanity & sink as big or as small as you like.

    "The question is: Is there anything in the building code that prevents a small non-load bearing wall such as this from being 2" thick made in the manner as described above? Would it probably pass the building inspector's review?"

    Nothing prevents what you describe and it's done regularly to reduce dead space. Just make it solid. When we build walls like this we use a single top & bottom plate out of 2x2 (ripped 2x whatever), and pre-dril holes in it to screw together. :)
  7. Bluegrass Picker

    Bluegrass Picker New Member

    Messages:
    12
    Location:
    Washington State
    Thanks very much for your reply and for your help. It is sincerely appreciated.

    I'll try to verify with the local building dept. about the sink clearances.

    I'll proceed with the idea of using the flat 2x4's for the wall. I might even use flat 2x6's for extra strength, and I will be drilling and screwing them into 2x2 top and bottom plates.

    Thanks again,

    Bluegrass Picker
  8. suceress

    suceress New Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    LA
    Distance from center of toilet to obstacle

    Nice sketches, Bluegrass Picker. Would love to see pics of the progress in the Remodeling section of the forums.

    I have a similar question and I think it may have already been answered but I'm asking just to make sure:

    The code says that walls/obstructions need to be at least 15" from the center of the toilet to the side. Does this include the arc of the door as well? Would it matter which direction the door would swing?

    [​IMG]

    or

    [​IMG]

    I would make sure that the door would not hit the toilet when opening inward as in the first picture (so it probably would not be as close as drawn). The only reason I'm considering it is because if it swings inward in the opposite direction it covers where the current light switch is (although that could probably be moved- the wall will likely have to be opened up anyway and moving it to the opposite side would make it closer to the circuit box).

    Would either way be acceptable according to code?
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  9. Reach4

    Reach4 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,886
    Location:
    IL
    From reading previous postings, either door swing is permitted. Also permitted would be a swing out against your wall in the hall.
  10. suceress

    suceress New Member

    Messages:
    153
    Location:
    LA
    Excellent. Thank you.
    I considered the swing-out as well. For some reason I was thinking that it would conflict with another door in the hallway, but I just remembered that the other door swings inward. The general plan would be to have a 26"Wx17" deep vanity across from the door and a curbless shower on the other side of the toilet. I have a lot more details in the thread: http://www.terrylove.com/forums/sho...ry-room-amp-useless-bathroom-need-suggestions

    It's rather long and convoluted but I have figured out how I would like for it to be laid out.
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