code compliance - GFCI and tamper resistant

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by beekerc, Oct 20, 2008.

  1. beekerc

    beekerc IT Consultant / Network Engineer

    Messages:
    94
    Location:
    Seattle
    2 questions, but both relating to NEC code

    1) code says that receptacles (excluding appliances) in a garage must be GFCI. if I am wiring outlets along a work bench (approx 36 to 48 inches off the floor if that matters). do i need put a GFCI receptacle in each outlet box? or can i put one GFCI at the first outlet box then connect the down-line non-GFCI (read: much cheaper) receptacles to the GFCI's LOAD side?

    2) I read that tamper resistant receptacles are required for all new residential constructions starting in 2008. does that cover new circuits installed into existing homes (ie. circuit expansions, remodelling)? I wouldn't think so and that it just refers to houses that are being built from the ground up, but I haven't studied the NEC code so I don't know *all* of rules or interpretive nuances.

    Thanks
    BeekerC
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,917
    Location:
    New England
    on #1, you can use a GFCI breaker, or one outlet, with the rest fed-through it.
  3. Johnny C

    Johnny C Electrician

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Mass. & now Virginia Beach, VA
    Tamper resistant recept.

    All 15 and 20 ampere receptacles installed in accordance with Section 210-52 are required to be of the "tamper resistant" type. That covers just about all 15 and 20 amp receptacles at a house. (OUCH)
  4. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

    Messages:
    992
    Location:
    NY State, USA
    Keep in mind this is a change for the new 2008 NEC, and only applies if your area is under that code (or similar amendments). Not nearly all areas follow the 2008 NEC.
  5. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

    Messages:
    992
    Location:
    NY State, USA
    Well, appliances with strict limitations under the 2005 NEC.


    (A) Dwelling Units All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20- ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

    (2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor
    located at or below grade level not intended as habitable
    rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and
    areas of similar use

    Exception No. 1 to (2): Receptacles that are not readily
    accessible.

    Exception No. 2 to (2): A single receptacle or a duplex
    receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space
    for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved
    from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected
    in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).



    Under the 2008 NEC ALL 125v 15 & 20 amp receptacles must be GFI protected.
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2008
  6. Johnny C

    Johnny C Electrician

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Mass. & now Virginia Beach, VA
    GFCI's

    To BEEKERC, You can install one GFCI receptacle feed other downstream receptacles from the load-side of the GFCI receptacle and they will be GFCI protected. You must place a label on the regular receptacles to indicate that they are GFCI protected.
  7. beekerc

    beekerc IT Consultant / Network Engineer

    Messages:
    94
    Location:
    Seattle
    thanks for the good info

    since i'm planning on putting the left and right halves of the garage on their own circuit, the demarcation point being the garage door into the basement, i was going to put a 2-gang box by the door and put a pair of dead-face GFCI's, that way i always know where to go when it trips. i know it's not as cost effective as making the first outlet in the run a GFCI receptacle, but it's the convenince of location, and i plan to pick a device that has both a green (on-line) and red (tripped) indicator light so you can see them from across the room.

    ah, that's what those labels that come with the GFCI outlets are for. :)

    RE: tamper resistant outlets, i still haven't gotten a definitive answer as to whether or not our locale has adopted 2008 code yet, or if the tamper resistant only applies to new constructions vs new circuits in a remodel. however, 30~50 plastic outlet plugs can be had for the same price as a single tamper resistant receptacle, and while my kids haven't yet been able to pull out a safety plug, i don't put it past them to try and stick two flat objects into an outlet at the same time, which defeats the tamper resistant device. for that matter, even if tamper resistant receptacles were required, i'd still probably put the plastic plugs in them anyway.

    thanks to all for the info and advice.
  8. Billy_Bob

    Billy_Bob In the Trades

    Messages:
    422
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