Would like a confirmation on Fleck 5600SXT settings

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IowaHardWater

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I've read through several posts which are similar to my own situation, but wanted to double check the values I've taken from other posts.

I recently purchased and plumbed my setup:

Fleck 5600SXT
48000 grain
10% crosslink resin
Municipal Water
Hardness of 18
Iron of 0
4 household members (two adults, two children)

Looking to get a good blend of "soft" and efficient. My understanding is that I should be max salt efficient using C30;BF6, but could be slightly more "soft" using C36;BF8

I've been dinking around with the settings for a day and landed here:

DF = Gal ;
VT = dF1b ;
CT = Fd ;
NT = 1 ;
C = 30.0 ;
H = 18 ;
RS = SF
SF = 10;
DO = 14 ;
RT = 2:00 ;
BW = 10 ;
Bd = 60 ;
RR = 10 ;
BF = 6 ;
FM = P.07 ;



What settings adjustments could you recommend that would be suitable for my setup?

Please let me know if I'm way off base with my understanding :)

Thanks!

-Justin
 

Bannerman

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Municipal water often has multiple sources, and each may have a different hardness quantity. Assuming hardness was tested at your specific location, it is usually recommended to program 2-3 additional grains hardness than tested into the softener (ie: 20-21 gpg) so as to anticipate occasions when hardness may be higher than usual.

Your Brine Fill settings appear correct when based on 0.5 gpm BLFC but, you didn't specify the BLFC rate (refill rate for Brine Tank) so that should be confirmed. The BLFC rate is usually indicated on a label located nearby to the brine line. While 0.5 gpm BLFC is most common, an alternate BLFC flow rate button could be installed.

Your FM=P.07 specifies a paddlewheel flow meter whereas turbine flow meters have become more common with newer 5600SXT valves. Check that the Flow Meter is correct as an incorrect FM setting will result in an incorrect capacity measurement to initiate regeneration.

Your Reserve settings (RS=SF, SF=10) allow for a reserve of 10% of capacity which will be 3000 grains. The Reserve setting should normally be 1-day usage which with 4 people with an anticipated daily usage of 60 gallons each, 60 X 4 X 20 gpg = 4800 grains/day softener load. The reserve setting should be increased to satisfy that usage.
 

IowaHardWater

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Municipal water often has multiple sources, and each may have a different hardness quantity. Assuming hardness was tested at your specific location, it is usually recommended to program 2-3 additional grains hardness than tested into the softener (ie: 20-21 gpg) so as to anticipate occasions when hardness may be higher than usual.

Your Brine Fill settings appear correct when based on 0.5 gpm BLFC but, you didn't specify the BLFC rate (refill rate for Brine Tank) so that should be confirmed. The BLFC rate is usually indicated on a label located nearby to the brine line. While 0.5 gpm BLFC is most common, an alternate BLFC flow rate button could be installed.

Your FM=P.07 specifies a paddlewheel flow meter whereas turbine flow meters have become more common with newer 5600SXT valves. Check that the Flow Meter is correct as an incorrect FM setting will result in an incorrect capacity measurement to initiate regeneration.

Your Reserve settings (RS=SF, SF=10) allow for a reserve of 10% of capacity which will be 3000 grains. The Reserve setting should normally be 1-day usage which with 4 people with an anticipated daily usage of 60 gallons each, 60 X 4 X 20 gpg = 4800 grains/day softener load. The reserve setting should be increased to satisfy that usage.


Thanks, Bannerman.

I confirmed on the valve the sticker next to the brine line indicates .5 GPM/1.5 LB salt/min.

I also confirmed the dome-like meter housing on the rear of the valve.

Sounds like I should set RS=rc and set RC=240. Also bump the H up a couple points.

Is there any value in adjusting the 10 min wash/rinse timers to 5 min?

Thanks!

Justin
 

Bannerman

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Is there any value in adjusting the 10 min wash/rinse timers to 5 min?
The purpose of Backwash is to lift the resin and expand the spaces between the resin beads and to redistribute (reclassify) the resin which will prevent channelling. It will also eliminate any sediment and debris that entered during regular water use as well as any broken or worn resin beads. Although 10 minutes is the standard BW time, if your water is usually visually clear, some will claim you may reduce BW to 5 minutes to save water without adverse effects. Both BW and Rapid Rinse will usually flow at 2.4 gpm with a 10" diameter tank which is the size most commonly used for 1.5 ft3 of media.

The purpose for Rapid Rinse is to repack the resin after BW and brining. As the resin will further pack down during regular water use in a downflow softener, the RR setting could be reduced to 4- 5 minutes to provide an initial pack to reduce the spaces between resin beads so the initial Service flow directly after regeneration will have full contact with the resin.

Brine Draw is actually 2 cycles in one setting - Brine Draw & Slow Rinse. 60 minutes is the most common setting. The brine should all be drawn from the brine tank within approx 1/4 of the setting, so the remaining ~45 minutes slow rinse will further push the brine through the resin bed and rinse chloride, calcium, magnesium and excess sodium from the resin bed. If the BD/SR setting is not sufficient, the initial service flow following regeneration will usually taste salty. Depending on the specific injector installed, flow during BD will often be ~ 1gpm wheres the flow during Slow Rinse will reduce to ~0.65 gpm.
 

IowaHardWater

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The purpose of Backwash is to lift the resin and expand the spaces between the resin beads and to redistribute (reclassify) the resin which will prevent channelling. It will also eliminate any sediment and debris that entered during regular water use as well as any broken or worn resin beads. Although 10 minutes is the standard BW time, if your water is usually visually clear, some will claim you may reduce BW to 5 minutes to save water without adverse effects. Both BW and Rapid Rinse will usually flow at 2.4 gpm with a 10" diameter tank which is the size most commonly used for 1.5 ft3 of media.

The purpose for Rapid Rinse is to repack the resin after BW and brining. As the resin will further pack down during regular water use in a downflow softener, the RR setting could be reduced to 4- 5 minutes to provide an initial pack to reduce the spaces between resin beads so the initial Service flow directly after regeneration will have full contact with the resin.

Brine Draw is actually 2 cycles in one setting - Brine Draw & Slow Rinse. 60 minutes is the most common setting. The brine should all be drawn from the brine tank within approx 1/4 of the setting, so the remaining ~45 minutes slow rinse will further push the brine through the resin bed and rinse chloride, calcium, magnesium and excess sodium from the resin bed. If the BD/SR setting is not sufficient, the initial service flow following regeneration will usually taste salty. Depending on the specific injector installed, flow during BD will often be ~ 1gpm wheres the flow during Slow Rinse will reduce to ~0.65 gpm.

Thanks again. I'll probably just leave them at the default of 10.

If I want to dial up the condition of the water for a softer feel, do I just adjust the
C and the BF values?
 

Bannerman

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As your softener is just new, the resin will be regenerated to full capacity so the water exiting should be at maximum softness. If your home is several years old and never had a softener before, some hardness scale in the pipes is likely being dissolved and adding hardness back into the water flowing to fixtures. Water stored in the water heater will typically require a few days before it is fully exchanged with softened water. Residual hardness scale may take some time before it is eventually eliminated.

The regenerated usable capacity and the salt setting are directly related. Each 1 gallon entering the brine tank will dissolve 3 lbs salt, which is why your 0.5 gpm BLFC label also specifies 1.5 lbs per minute.

The attached chart indicates numerous softener sizes by cubic feet of resin. Across the width of the chart are various usable capacities based on the salt setting in-lbs per ft3 of resin. At the bottom of the chart shows salt efficiency for each salt setting as well as the amount of hardness leakage to eventually occur after repeated regeneration at each salt setting.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?attachments/resin-chart-jpg.53316/
 

IowaHardWater

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As your softener is just new, the resin will be regenerated to full capacity so the water exiting should be at maximum softness. If your home is several years old and never had a softener before, some hardness scale in the pipes is likely being dissolved and adding hardness back into the water flowing to fixtures. Water stored in the water heater will typically require a few days before it is fully exchanged with softened water. Residual hardness scale may take some time before it is eventually eliminated.

The regenerated usable capacity and the salt setting are directly related. Each 1 gallon entering the brine tank will dissolve 3 lbs salt, which is why your 0.5 gpm BLFC label also specifies 1.5 lbs per minute.

The attached chart indicates numerous softener sizes by cubic feet of resin. Across the width of the chart are various usable capacities based on the salt setting in-lbs per ft3 of resin. At the bottom of the chart shows salt efficiency for each salt setting as well as the amount of hardness leakage to eventually occur after repeated regeneration at each salt setting.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?attachments/resin-chart-jpg.53316/


Thanks for the chart. Based on that my C should be 31.5. Not sure if the valve can program decimals, so maybe just going with 31.

This has been very helpful. I've seen some posts using DO=28 for medium hardness municipal water. Is that a worthwhile change to save a bit of water exchange?
 

Bannerman

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Some softener settings are often close enough. While 30K grains using 9 lbs salt for 1.5 ft3 of resin has been a long-standing recommendation, I suspect additional efficiencies have been recognized which Ditttohead included in stating 31.5K when preparing the chart.

With 31K grains usable capacity, and normal consumption anticipated to be 4,800 grains/day, regeneration will likely occur approx every 5 days (31,000 / 4800 = 6.46 days - 1-day reserve). The DO setting will be the maximum number of days between regeneration if water consumption has been too low to initiate regeneration by usage, such as if you are away on an extended vacation. Unless your water consumption is significantly lower than anticipated, extending the DO setting will not likely save water, but a 30-day setting will be OK.

It is generally preferable to regenerate no more than 1X each week. Setting 36K grains capacity with 12 lbs salt, will provide 6 - 7 days usage. Although the 8 lb/ft3 salt setting will be slightly less salt efficient, capacity will be higher so fewer regenerations should be needed each year, thereby reducing water consumption and sewer discharge through the year, and, higher-quality soft water will be available for your family's use.
 
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IowaHardWater

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Some softener settings are often close enough. While 30K grains using 9 lbs salt for 1.5 ft3 of resin has been a long-standing recommendation, I suspect additional efficiencies have been recognized which Ditttohead included in stating 31.5K when preparing the chart.

With 31K grains usable capacity, and normal consumption anticipated to be 4,800 grains/day, regeneration will likely occur approx every 5 days (31,000 / 4800 = 6.46 days - 1-day reserve). The DO setting will be the maximum number of days between regeneration if water consumption has been too low to initiate regeneration by usage, such as if you are away on an extended vacation. Unless your water consumption is significantly lower than anticipated, extending the DO setting will not likely save water, but a 30-day setting will be OK.

It is generally preferable to regenerate no more than 1X each week. Setting 36K grains capacity with 12 lbs salt, will provide 6 - 7 days usage. Although the 8 lb/ft3 salt setting will be slightly less salt efficient, capacity will be higher so fewer regenerations should be needed each year, thereby reducing water consumption and sewer discharge through the year, and, higher-quality soft water will be available for your family's use.


It just dawned on me that BF is minutes * 1.5/lb (per minute) = 9lbs per regen. Took me too long to catch onto that :) I need to jot all these equations down somewhere...
 
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