Whole House Sediment Filter Recommendation (City Water)

Users who are viewing this thread

mawst95

New Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Maryland
Hi all,

I've searched the forums some, which has been helpful, but need some additional advice before pulling the trigger. We moved into a home in Baltimore, MD in July. Home had a rusco 1.5" spin down filter installed (not sure the micron level). It was completely chocked full of orange/brown sediment (fine--like clay, maybe rust?). Cleaned it and had our water tested by a recommended vendor. Water quality was good in terms of TDS, pH, chlorine, hardness, and many other contaminants. Iron forms weren't particularly elevated either.

That said, we're still having sediment issues. Switched to a finer mesh, including a 30 micron mesh for the rusco. It's completely covered in sediment within a week. My fiancé is apoplectic over the issue, despite the fact that I think this is mostly a nuisance issue rather than a health issue. We replaced the 10 year old water heater in the home because we had it flushed and the amount of sediment that came out was jaw dropping. The fiancé had them install a new one on the spot.

I have devised three options for your consideration and kind (or not) criticism:

A) Install two more rusco 1.5 inch spin down filters in order of decreasing mesh size (e.g., 250-->100-->30 microns). According to rusco adding filters in series is acceptable.

B) Use my existing spin down filter as a prefilter for one of the 24 x 4.5 inch filters, such as this: https://www.supplyhouse.com/3M-Aqua...le-House-Large-Diameter-Filter-Housing-45-GPM and this filter: https://www.supplyhouse.com/3M-Aqua...acement-Cartridge-Standard-Sediment-Reduction

So that would be two filters in series. I would also order a couple pressure gauges: https://www.supplyhouse.com/Watts-0121640-DPG1-2-1-2-Pressure-Gauge-Lead-Free-0-100-psi

C) Use my existing rusco spin down filter as pre-filter and install this or something similar you recommend: https://www.freedrinkingwater.com/wts-sed-20.htm

Obviously option C is an order of magnitude more expensive and I'm not DIY'ing this. Our plumber will do it and the install for C will also be more expensive. House has 3 full baths and 2 half baths, 3200 Sqft. It was built in 1937 if that matters.

My fiancé is urging me to fix this ASAP, so any advice you have would be welcome. Thank you!
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,054
Reaction score
3,570
Points
113
Location
IL
That backwashing filter may be worthwhile, but seems expensive if it is what I think it is -- a backwashing filter using a passive media like sand but lighter than sand, such as Filter-Ag.

If you had another problem, then you could have some media that will improve that iron or H2S or something, plus do the mechanical filtering.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/deleted.69063/
https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/atlas-filtri-hydra-video.69789/
https://www.plumbingsupply.com/lakos-twist-ii-clean-inline-water-filter.html

Lakos used to make the Twist II Clean, but they sold it off. https://static1.squarespace.com/sta.../1595341344477/TwistIIClean+Brochure-2020.pdf
 
Last edited:

Treeman

Active Member
Messages
214
Reaction score
31
Points
28
Location
Michigan
VERY late to this discussion. I don't understand the original question. The filter seems to be doing its job of collecting sediment. Is the OP saying that he still has sediment AFTER the filter? The OP says he cleans the filter and it clogs up again. That's what it is supposed to do. Someone please explain. My Rusco filters turn bad and require monthly removal and cleaning. I have free iron that precipitates and clogs the filter.
 

Zenon2cubed

Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
4
Points
8
Location
Manitoba
Treeman, cleaning a rusco weekly would not be my preferred solution. A backwashing sediment filter will take care of itself, but is a bit overkill to just remove sediment without solving any other issues.

mawst95, if a simple purge manages to clean the mesh screen rusco also makes a timed solenoid valve to automatically purge nightly for example. If a manual scrub is needed to remove debris, I've also heard the stainless meshes are more prone to holding particulate, switching to their other material may eliminate the need for hand scrubbing.
 

mawst95

New Member
Messages
7
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Maryland
VERY late to this discussion. I don't understand the original question. The filter seems to be doing its job of collecting sediment. Is the OP saying that he still has sediment AFTER the filter? The OP says he cleans the filter and it clogs up again. That's what it is supposed to do. Someone please explain. My Rusco filters turn bad and require monthly removal and cleaning. I have free iron that precipitates and clogs the filter.

Hi Treeman,

Yes, that's what I am saying. There's sediment showing up in our sinks, toilets, etc. despite the filter. And the filter is gunking up in what seems like a week AND it's not adequately addressing the problem in my opinion.

What I ended up doing is plumb in three filters in series: Rusco spindown 100 mesh, Rusco spindown with 250 mesh, then a 24x10 with a 50-5 micron filter. I put gauges at the start, in between the Ruscos and the 24x10 and then after the 24x10. Sediment is a lot better, though I haven't scientifically tested it. City came out and tested the water and says the sediment falls within their acceptable levels.
 

WorthFlorida

The wife is still training me.
Messages
4,695
Reaction score
709
Points
113
Location
Orlando, Florida
.......... City came out and tested the water and says the sediment falls within their acceptable levels. ??????
Ask for a quality water report from the water division or it maybe avaialble on line, then compare it to your report. An annual report must be filed with the EPA. What is the minimum standard for sediment? You're getting what seems to be an extreme amount of sediment from a public water supply. Has the city or anyone else have an idea what this sediment is? How about your neighbors? Do they have the same issues? Install a Reverse Osmose system under the kitchen sink for drinking water and the ice maker for the refrigerator. Perhaps one on the bathroom sink for the fiance'.


 

Bannerman

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,288
Reaction score
593
Points
113
Location
Ontario, Canada
Iron forms weren't particularly elevated either.

Is there a municipal water supply well that is nearby to your home?

Well water will often contain ferrous (dissolved) iron and/or manganese and sometimes other dissolved metals/minerals. In Municipal systems, chlorine or chloramine (chlorine and ammonia) is most commonly added to ensure the bacterial safety of the water.

Although ferrous iron/manganese will pass through a sediment filter, chlorine and other oxidizers will oxidize those metals, converting them to a ferric (not dissolved) state, so the resulting solid sediment may then be easily removed using a sediment filter. The solids will also frequently precipitate out from the water as sludge within the water distribution network.

For full oxidation to occur, there must be sufficient contact time for active chlorine to oxidize all of the iron/manganese dissolved in the water. If your home is located fairly nearby to one of the municipal wells, there maybe insufficient contact time between that well and your home, resulting in some amount of ferrous iron/manganese which continue to pass through your sediment filters. Any water that collects in sinks, showers, toilets etc will be exposed to air which will oxidize remaining ferrous elements, resulting in residual sediment collecting at those locations.

The Iron/manganese that was converted to a ferric state and precipitated within the water supply main before your home, maybe becoming stirred up while water flow though the main is greatest so the stirred up sludge maybe the reason for the heavy sediment that is collecting In your sediment filters.

As suggested, a large backwashing media filter maybe more effective and a preferable method to reduce the need for frequent filter maintenance as the collected sediment will be automatically eliminated to drain on an ongoing schedule.

If there is actually any ferrous iron/manganese entering your home, you may wish to consider utilizing Katalox Light media within the backwashing filter as that media with the assistance of residual active chlorine, will likely convert all residual ferrous iron/manganese to a ferric state which will be filtered out by the media along with heavy sediment that continues to enter from the municipal distribution system.
 
Last edited:
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks