What Valve is Designed to Reduce Flow but Not Eliminate It?

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Dwassner

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I have one circulator pump. One of my zones is getting a lot more flow due to size, elbows, etc.

I have had the ball valve partially shut to balance the flow but know that this is not the right way to do it in the long term.

I thought the valve I needed was a 'globe valve' but when I search for this I am either finding 'globe style shut off valves' or very large expensive industrial looking items.

Any input is appreciated.

DW
 

WorthFlorida

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How are the other zones controlled? Do each have its own thermostat? Is your problem with this one zone gets too warm and the others are too cool?
 

Dwassner

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There are 4 zones, each have their own thermostat. The system is plumbed direct - there is no primary/secondary.

Two of the zones consistently get warm enough to satisfy their thermostats, while the other two are always 3-5 degrees below satisfying their thermostats...

Closing the ball valve to the higher flow zones helps balance things out, but this will wear away the valves over time, and is not very precise...
 

Reach4

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Just use a 1/2" screwed globe valve and two 1/2" mpt x 3/4 pex adaptors. Only have seen ball valves in pex.
Aren't ball valves often used to partially block a flow? I guess you think that is a bad practice.
 

Fitter30

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Aren't ball valves often used to partially block a flow? I guess you think that is a bad practice.
Ball valves don't work for flow control very well. Close ball valve 50% doesn't have 50% of flow more like 70% Close ball valve 80% has 50% of flow. Globe valves are a lot more linear instead of 1/4 turn from open to closed might have 6-8 turns. Gate valves are not much better than ball valves.
 

Dwassner

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OK, but why 1/2"? Why not use a 3/4" valve with 3/4" fittings, so that if for whatever reason necessary, I can at least achieve full flow if desired?

Seems like going with a 1/2" valve would build in a permanent reduction?...
 

Fitter30

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All valves have a rating cv which is a flow rate of 60* water flowing through the device at 1 lb of pressure drop 1/2" valve 5 .1 gpm 3/4" - 9 gpm. Smaller valve gives more control
 
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A globe valve would be better than a gate or ball valve. Ideally if you could find one that does not have a rubber gasket to seal flow when closed. One that has a metal disc and seat. I would be concerned that other time the rubber on the disc of most globe valve would deteriorate and fall off.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Matco-Norca-200T04LF-3-4-Threaded-Globe-Valve-Lead-Free

Based on the submittal sheet looks like this one does not have rubber on the disc.

Industrial valves that a designed to modulate flow use various methods to throttle flow and make sure cavitation does not occur.

Not that I think cavitation is going to be an issue, but I would put the valve down stream of the pump.
 
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