What size meter for 1000 ft water line?

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Farmer Tim

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I am finally getting city water!! I currently have a well about 600 ft. from my house and it uses 1 1/2" PVC pipe. I also have a booster pump and small tank in my basement to provide adequate water pressure to the house.

I have a couple of options:
- run a new line from the meter to the house ~ 1000 ft.
- run a new line to my pump house and tie into my current pipe ~ 400 ft.

Also, I can get a 3/4" meter or a 1" meter. The 1" meter is twice as much per month as the 3/4" meter and the tap on fee is an additional $700.

Will the 3/4" meter and 1 1/2" pipe supply enough water? I plan on keeping the booster pump and tank, at least for the short term.
Is there an advantage to running a completely new line? What type of pipe should I use?

There is about a 90 ft. elevation from the street to the house. I have 3 full baths, 1 half bath, and currently have no water pressure problems.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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hj

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The meter has NOTHING to do with the pressure you will have, it only affects the potential volume. IF a 3/4" meter delivers enough volume, then that is all you need. The size of the pipe from the meter to the house is what will determine the volume you get, so it should be as large as possible for the distance it runs.
 

Reach4

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So 90 ft rise from the new meter connection to the house.
  1. How much rise to the pump house?
  2. What water pressure do you expect to have at the street?
 

Farmer Tim

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So 90 ft rise from the new meter connection to the house.
  1. How much rise to the pump house?
  2. What water pressure do you expect to have at the street?
No rise to the pump house.
I believe the water pressure will be about 65psi at the street
 

Reach4

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So about 40 psi loss due to just the 90 ft. You could put the booster in the pump house, if you want to make the house quieter.
 

Farmer Tim

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So about 40 psi loss due to just the 90 ft. You could put the booster in the pump house, if you want to make the house quieter.

Thanks! Since all of the plumbing is in place, I'll probably just leave it - already use to the noise - not much and for just a minute.
I plan to continue to use the well for outside faucets, barn and stable.
 

Reach4

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If the pressure at the meter dropped to 50 psi, and you had friction loss in addition, you could have a problem.

So if you route through the pump house, you would have the option to add/move a pump there.

http://www.pressure-drop.com/Online-Calculator/ Note the Group drop-down list that lets you select for elbows etc. Add the pressure drops. I would figure 10 gpm to 20 gpm for your calculations.
 

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If the pressure at the meter dropped to 50 psi, and you had friction loss in addition, you could have a problem.

So if you route through the pump house, you would have the option to add/move a pump there.

http://www.pressure-drop.com/Online-Calculator/ Note the Group drop-down list that lets you select for elbows etc. Add the pressure drops. I would figure 10 gpm to 20 gpm for your calculations.

That makes sense to route it through the pump house. I had not thought about adding a booster pump there. Would there be an advantage to add a pressure tank in the pump house to help push the water up the hill?
 

Reach4

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That makes sense to route it through the pump house. I had not thought about adding a booster pump there. Would there be an advantage to add a pressure tank in the pump house to help push the water up the hill?
It is generally considered easier to push water than to pull water. There is little chance of running out of water to suck.
 
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