Wet venting laundry group from old drain

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ChrisMDL

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Hello All, I hope you can check to see if my plan will work. I am moving my laundry from the 1st floor to the basement. Currently it drains through a 2" copper drain, the 1.5" kitchen sink also drains to the 2", then goes into my basement floor. Both of these drains share a vent that connects in the attic before going through the roof. The other photo of the other plumbing stack shows my other plumbing stack that drain 2.5 bathrooms.

I would like to move the laundry machine to the basement and add a slop sink. I would also like to add a slop sink to where the laundry used to be upstairs. See attached proposed photo of my plan.

Location: New Jersey, USA

Questions:
1) do I add a double santee or double fixture fitting for this?
2.) do I need AAVs anywhere in this setup? The slop sink and laundry stack will be on each side of this 2" stack (with 15"-20")
3.) What should I change of my plan?

Thanks for all the great help this forum provides!!



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Terry

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Wet venting is only for bath fixtures located on the same floor. They figure a bathroom lav with 1.25" tailpiece isn't draining much at a time, unlike a kitchen sink and dishwasher.

Each floor gets vented separately, and can revent at 6" above the highest flood level on the next floor up.

dwv_b2.jpg


The downstairs sink and washer will need venting.
 

ChrisMDL

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Okay understood. Would this setup be appropriate? Off the 2” copper stack would be an AAV then a drain for the slop sink. I would have the washing machine drain into the slop sink tub.

Also second question, if I wanted a washing machine drain on the 2nd floor above the original laundry room drain, could I add that as well? The idea being we would have this basement laundry and also a 2nd floor laundry.

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ChrisMDL

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A bit of an update and an additional question. After setting the laundry tub, I see that I would need to raise it quite a bit to execute my original plan. What if I removed that cast iron clean out? What product should I be getting/researching that would fit into that drain stub out that’s in the concrete?
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Jeff H Young

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You need a rubber I believe proper name and spelling "donut' common brand is Fernco 3 inch cast iron x ? depending . Are you planning to dump 2 Washing Machines there? You can put a san tee or wye on low and add a new cleanout above rather than omit the c/o altogether
 

ChrisMDL

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Thank you. I went out and sourced a Fernco donut. But I believe I’ve now opened a giant can of worms. I began drilling the lead and oakum connection to try to remove that cast iron clean out. And the cast iron pipe snapped in probably the worst imaginable way.

That dark line close to the concrete floor, that’s where it’s half snapped. I haven’t fully pulled it off because this drain services our kitchen sink and laundry room.

So how do I fix this? Do I need to bust up the concrete floor to find where it turns horizontal? Then attach a shielded coupling to that and come out of the slab in 3” PVC?

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Sylvan

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You should remove the galvanized band iron and replace it with a clevis hanger or copper coated band iron or rainbow packing
 

John Gayewski

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That looks to be a sweep fitting protruding from the concrete if that's the case then yes you need to bust up the concrete and remove the fitting and attach with a fernco.
 

Jeff H Young

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you can actualy cut the cast iron fitting with a grinder and cut off wheel perhaps only chip a minimal amount to get a shielded or fernco on there . if its exposed and you can see the joint and you dont have it all drwalled and carpeted you could wind up with a decent repair not quite legal, but when it comes to a repair thats not buried or extremely sensitive area I might or (likely) would do a repair on that I think cutting down close to slab and fudging a bit with a 22.5 degree fitting (or a pair of fittings) you can come up verticle. might need to grid a bit on bumps or smooth out the outside of the sweep. or bust out floor you never know what cans your opening though but likely not too bad a job either way. taking another look might be safer just to bite the bullet and replace the entire sweep
 

ChrisMDL

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Jeff thanks again for the great advice. I snapped the whole thing off. I then took the grinder with a metal cut off wheel and got the fitting flat. Then switched to a diamond blade, and with the grinder I was a surgeon. I dug out enough concrete to get a fernco shielding coupling on. It’s fully seated and rock solid. I ordered a 11.5 degree elbow and once that comes in I should be able to finish. The 22.5 degree street doesn’t get be back vertical.
 

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Jeff H Young

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well I was thinking 2 22.5 fittings you could have sort of turned them in a certain way . looks like you pretty much have it though keep ne eye on it and don't let a lot of weight bear down . its sort of a personal fix for your own home.
 

ChrisMDL

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Welp here she is in all her glory! Thanks everyone for the help. It looks a little Janky but it works.
 

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John Gayewski

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The 11.25 fitting isn't a recessed drainage pattern fitting. Just fyi. I wouldn't change it now I've used them. They are handy and I wish they would make them in a legal pattern.
 
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