Water in yard when pump runs

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RC50

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I have a well system, metal encased well. Everything works fine, but about 25ft from the well I'm getting standing water on the grass. I'm noticing this when I do laundry when it's drawing more water I'm assuming or when it's backflushing, I have a neutralizer tank. Just from internet searching can this be a well line that's leaking? The line running from underneath the house appears to be rubber or plastic tubing to the outside?? If a leaking line, what are the normal procedures for detecting and fixing the problem. Thanks in advance
 

Greenmonster123

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This would be the first step

2BDE397D-39C5-4CE5-AC2D-B57D6FA8B74C.jpeg
 

Reach4

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Could it be that the washing machine drain is run to the yard? It could be that they intended to make a "dry well" but there was not enough gravel to take the load.

Is your septic tank in that area?
 

RC50

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Could it be that the washing machine drain is run to the yard? It could be that they intended to make a "dry well" but there was not enough gravel to take the load.

Is your septic tank in that area?
I do have a septic tank but thats on the other side of the yard. The washer dumps into the septic line.
 

Reach4

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Do you have an above-ground check valve for the well system? If in doubt, show us a photo that include the pipe from the well, the input to the pressure tank, and the pressure switch. I suspect you do have a check valve near the pressure tank.

It may be that you have a leak near the pitless adapter (passes water from the well), or in the pipe from the pitless adapter to the house. You said 25 ft from the well. How far from the house?
 

RC50

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Do you have an above-ground check valve for the well system? If in doubt, show us a photo that include the pipe from the well, the input to the pressure tank, and the pressure switch. I suspect you do have a check valve near the pressure tank.

It may be that you have a leak near the pitless adapter (passes water from the well), or in the pipe from the pitless adapter to the house. You said 25 ft from the well. How far from the house?
Check valve I believe is underground near the well. I have a crawlspace. The pressure tank, neutralizer tank, pressure switch are all there. I would say 40 ft from where I see water to the area of the crawlspace where my well equipment is.
 

Reach4

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Normal best is to have the only checkvalves in or right above the pump. That is not the custom, or even law, in a few areas. An advantage of no above-ground check valves is that the piping stays pressurized. So a leak will not allow contamination to be sucked in.

You report only getting puddling when using water. So that water would either from before a check valve (else leaking would occur all of the time), or that is not water right from the well (i.e., drain water).

You could try redirecting the washing machine drain water to a ditch to see if that causes the puddling to not occur.

It is possible to add dye to drain water to identify, but it takes a good while for that dye to propagate.
 

RC50

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Normal best is to have the only checkvalves in or right above the pump. That is not the custom, or even law, in a few areas. An advantage of no above-ground check valves is that the piping stays pressurized. So a leak will not allow contamination to be sucked in.

You report only getting puddling when using water. So that water would either from before a check valve (else leaking would occur all of the time), or that is not water right from the well (i.e., drain water).

You could try redirecting the washing machine drain water to a ditch to see if that causes the puddling to not occur.

It is possible to add dye to drain water to identify, but it takes a good while for that dye to propagate.
I know
Normal best is to have the only checkvalves in or right above the pump. That is not the custom, or even law, in a few areas. An advantage of no above-ground check valves is that the piping stays pressurized. So a leak will not allow contamination to be sucked in.

You report only getting puddling when using water. So that water would either from before a check valve (else leaking would occur all of the time), or that is not water right from the well (i.e., drain water).

You could try redirecting the washing machine drain water to a ditch to see if that causes the puddling to not occur.

It is possible to add dye to drain water to identify, but it takes a good while for that dye to propagate.
I know for sure the check valve is at the well pump underground because I've had a problem with it before with so they replaced that along with the pump. I have a metal encased well which isn't ideal because it's a crap shoot if they can pull the pump out. They already told me if they cant, the only choice is to drill a new well with PVC. The ground in that area appears to be always saturated now that I'm keeping tabs, it's just when I do laundry, the system is backflushing I'm getting puddles. My washer machine dumps into my septic directly so there is no way that's causing this. The area where I'm getting the water is about 20-25ft away from the well.
 

Reach4

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You are saying there is no check valve at the pressure tank. In that case, the supply line is pressurized all of the time. A leak in the line from the well would always leak-- not just when you have been using water.
 

Bannerman

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it's just when I do laundry, the system is backflushing I'm getting puddles.
What is 'backflushing' while laundry washing is being performed?

A pH neutralizer system should not be backwashing while water is being drawn. The backwash cycle will be typically programmed to take place every few nights or even nightly during which time residents will be sleeping so little to no water will be utilized while the media is being back washed.

If water continues to exit the pH neutralizer drain line while the unit is not undergoing a programmed backwash cycle, this suggests there is a problem with the neutralizer's control valve which will likely require rebuilding the valve to resolve that issue.

Does the well pump periodically startup while no water is being utilized? If so, shut off the main water valve feeding the house (should be located after the well pump's pressure tank and pressure switch) to help to determine where a leak is located, either before or after the pressure tank. If the pump no longer continues to startup, this will indicate there is a leak after the pressure tank (seeping toilet?) but if the pump continues to periodically startup while the house feed main valve is completely closed, this will usually confirm there is a leak somewhere between the pump and the main valve.
 
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RC50

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You are saying there is no check valve at the pressure tank. In that case, the supply line is pressurized all of the time. A leak in the line from the well would always leak-- not just when you have been using water.
That's my thinking, the well line from the pump to the house has a losse fitting or a leak. It's probably leaking all the time when the pump runs, but it's more noticeable when it's drawing water more frequently like doing laundry, running my sprinklers etc..
 

RC50

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What is 'backflushing' while laundry washing is being performed?

A pH neutralizer system should not be backwashing while water is being drawn. The backwash cycle will be typically programmed to take place every few nights or even nightly during which time residents will be sleeping so little to no water will be utilized while the media is being back washed.

If water continues to exit the pH neutralizer drain line while the unit is not undergoing a programmed backwash cycle, this suggests there is a problem with the neutralizer's control valve which will likely require rebuilding the valve to resolve that issue.

Does the well pump periodically startup while no water is being utilized? If so, shut off the main water valve feeding the house (should be located after the well pump's pressure tank and pressure switch) to help to determine where a leak is located, either before or after the pressure tank. If the pump no longer continues to startup, this will indicate there is a leak after the pressure tank (seeping toilet?) but if the pump continues to periodically startup while the house feed main valve is completely closed, this will usually confirm there is a leak somewhere between the pump and the main valve.
I'm not seeing the pump click on to stabilize pressure, the system appears to be working fine other than puddles of water in the yard approx 20 feet from well pump. I only notice the puddling when it appears it's drawing more water like doing laundry etc. I have noticed the ground is constantly wet when it's not puddling which leads me to believe there is a problem with the supply line between the house and well. I'm not sure how deep the piping is, but it must be a good amount of water leaking for it to be puddling.
 

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Check valve I believe is underground near the well.
If you have a check valve underground near the well, the leak will be between the well and that check valve. That leak needs to be fixed and the underground check valve removed. With a second check valve in place, the leak you have is also drawing that muddy water into the well piping and contaminating your water supply.
 

RC50

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PIf you have a check valve underground near the well, the leak will be between the well and that check valve. That leak needs to be fixed and the underground check valve removed. With a second check valve in place, the leak you have is also drawing that muddy water into the well piping and contaminating your water supply.
I'm not aware of a second check valve. But I'm not a well expert. I know I have one underground near the well pump because it was replaced with the pump a few years ago. Because I have a metal encased well it was a pain in the butt to pull out. They said if at some point it doesn't come up they would have to drill a new well. I'm hoping if they have to pull it up they can
 

RC50

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I'm not aware of a second check valve. But I'm not a well expert. I know I have one underground near the well pump because it was replaced with the pump a few years ago. Because I have a metal encased well it was a pain in the butt to pull out. They said if at some point it doesn't come up they would have to drill a new well. I'm hoping if they have to pull it up they can
I have a well company coming out Monday so I will be sure to give an update. Hopefully it's easy on my wallet:D
 

Bannerman

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I know I have one underground near the well pump because it was replaced with the pump a few years ago.
It seems there may be a misunderstanding due to your choice of words. You said there is a check-valve 'underground' but I suspect you maybe actually referring to, down in the well above the well pump.
 

Reach4

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I'm not aware of a second check valve. But I'm not a well expert. I know I have one underground near the well pump because it was replaced with the pump a few years ago. Because I have a metal encased well it was a pain in the butt to pull out. They said if at some point it doesn't come up they would have to drill a new well. I'm hoping if they have to pull it up they can
Post the photo.

If you have a 4 inch casing and get the pump out some day, you should probably get that pump replaced with a 3-inch pump.

But for now we expect the problem is not the pump and the problem is not in the well casing. Post the photo.
 
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