Underground 3" conduit to semi flush panel

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Turbodanz

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I am planning to upgrade from a 100 Amp panel to a 200 Amp panel. In order to do this, I need to run new conduit from the hand hole in my front yard to the side of my house where the current panel is. The electrical company will be pulling the new feed into the conduit but I will be doing the trenching and putting in the conduit. An electrician will replace the panel. The electricians I have discussed with so far all recommend replacing the panel with the new panel in the same location. The new panel would be semi flush which is how the current panel is installed. What I'm struggling with is how the riser from the underground conduit will end up within the wall. The house is built on slab and wondering the best method to get the 90 elbow into the wall. I was told I could use a jack hammer to chisel out a notch in the slab for the PVC conduit riser. But wondering if this is the best way and if it will cause any structural concerns. Or is there some other way to approach this?
 

WorthFlorida

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Chipping away at the foundation (footing) does not sound like a great idea and you'll may run into rebar. You also must deal with seismic codes. What is semi flush? Panel generally run about 5" deep with a finished wall up to it it maybe about four inches out? Your old panel was probably mounted on the unfinished wall either wood frame covered in plywood or cement block then covered with stucco after the panel was installed.

How far does the panel extend out from the finished wall? What type of wall?

Depending on your finished outside wall, remove the siding or stucco to get the the unfinished wall. Mount the panel. after the wiring is complete then place the finish wall up to the new panel. The conduit does not have to be perfectly parallel to the wall.

After the install you can frame around the panel and conduit with treated lumber and plywood, then apply your finished wall. You will have a bump out about 3-4 inches but with landscaping it can be screened off. There are panel that are flush mounted, therefore you would need to frame the wall with 2x4's for a bump out look.
 
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