Toilet flange no longer has 12" from wall (following remodel)

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Bob3800, Apr 16, 2019 at 1:14 PM.

  1. Bob3800

    Bob3800 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2018
    Location:
    South Florida
    Currently during a bathroom remodel. The wall behind the toilet was tiled, which resulted in the toilet flange being closer than 12" to the finished the wall. It appears I've now lost ~1"

    The toilet requires a 12" rough-in. Would an offset flange solve my problem? If so, what type is best suited for this purpose?

    Thanks!

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  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    There are toilets that can use your 11 inch rough in.

    There are good offset flanges that will offset maybe 1.5 inches if you are willing to go that far.

    There are options. What's your pleasure?
     
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  4. Bob3800

    Bob3800 New Member

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    Thanks! The toilet we have is Toto Ultramax II, I'm fairly confident it won't work in this application, and ideally I'd like to keep it. Which toilets are you aware of that will work here?

    1" seems like the ideal distance, but perhaps the extra half inch would negligible. I've heard it's best to avoid offset flanges, but it seems like it might be the only practical option if I wish to keep this toilet.

    I'm also wondering if the tile work might need to be disturbed. To me it seems like there should be enough clearance to accommodate a new flange.


    IMG_20190416_1619511.jpg
     
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    If you were to change the flange, you would need to disturb the tile. The question is could you get the flange replaced without disturbing the part of the tile not covered by the toilet.
     
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    The way that flange is set now will cause problems. First off, an all-plastic one is asking for problems, it's not hard to crack the rim of it. Second, if it isn't anchored to the substrate, breaking or warping it will likely occur soon.

    There are at least a few designs of offset flanges. Those that look more like an offset funnel work fine. Those that have a shallow dish with the main hole offset, don't.

    You want a flange with a stainless steel ring on it so that it first, won't rust, and second, is much stronger than an all-plastic one.

    What's the surface underneath the tile? Is this on a slab, or is it a wooden subfloor with access from below?
     
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Occupation:
    Plumber
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    Bothell, Washington
    Set the toilet against the wall and then measure how far out the slots are.
    You can normally offset the closet bolts 3/8" of an inch off center and make it work.
    It looks like the current spec for an Ultramax II puts it 3/4" out on a 12" rough. Move the bolts out 3/8" and you even have some room there.
     
  8. Bob3800

    Bob3800 New Member

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    Aug 20, 2018
    Location:
    South Florida
    Thanks for the tips everyone! @Terry if I can make that work it would be great.

    The subfloor is concrete slab. I could always add cement to support the flange. In hindsight maybe I should've considered removing the flange before the retile. Someone advised me that on remodel this approach is normal...

    The original flange was installed by a contractor, given the option I always opt for the higher quality route, so appreciate your feedback re: stainless
     
  9. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    How far does the pipe the flange is on go down straight before turning?
     
  10. Bob3800

    Bob3800 New Member

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    Aug 20, 2018
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    South Florida
    Plenty. I'm not on site to measure exactly, but it must be at least 15", as this was a slab which was raised quite a bit during a garage conversion .
     
  11. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    This is good. You could insert a Pushtite flange, or you could dig down, cut the pipe, and glue a new pipe in place.

    That would be a good option if what you have fails for some reason.

    Is the toilet centerline on an optimum place? If not, a 1.5 offset flange would let you set the toilet both an inch away from the wall and and an inch to the right at the same time.

    If you extended a 3 inch pipe after cutting and digging, the Jones Stephens C40320 cast iron 3 inch compression flange looks interesting. It may be easier than a glued flange for the less-practiced. It could be replaced, although I don't see it needing to be replaced ever. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019 at 6:54 AM
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