The Right Choice for Drill Bit Size/Types

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I searched around the forum for my answer but only found pieces of info so I hope it is OK to ask.

There are many ways to drill a hole in wood. You have regular drill bits, spade bits, auger bits, hole saws and others...I even saw one this morning with some type of razor blades on the bottom. I went to buy a few bits today and realized while staring at the wall...I didn't know which types were appropriate for the specific tasks to come.

So my question is what do the pro's use for the typical plumbing and electrical needs when drilling through framing members? I know they could all do the job, but what is the best/most typical used?

I saw in another thread someone said that typically a plumber uses 1-3/8", 2-1/8" and 2-9/16" bits but not of what type. I assume the 1-3/8" covers your typical water lines and associated insulating clamps, the 2-1/8" for 2"PVC, not quite sure about the 2-9/16" one.

So what I am looking for is the plumber's (or electrician's) choice for size and type of bit to be used for the following...

1/2" CPVC water supply with insulating clamps
3/4" CPVC water supply with insulating clamps
1-1/2" PVC fixture drain
2" PVC fixture drain
3" PVC stack
single 12-2 NM
double 12-2 NM
triple 12-2 NM
 
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Clutchcargo

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Let me pile on... this would be a great sticky as well.
These might be the the same as PVC, but can we add 1/2 PEX, 3/4 PEX?
Shower drain hole sizes using various drains (Oatey, FloFX, Schluter, etc.)
Finally, hole sizes for the various sizes of closet flanges.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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For all water hole sizes use a 1-3/8 bit. that is the size that all the tube supports / grommets fit into for holding water pipes secure 1/2-1" copper tube size pipe, which CPVC is.

I use the Milwaukee Big Hawg hole saws for all my waste holes. 1.5-3"... They do have a 4-5/8 bit available for this as well. These bits eat wood but because they only remove the perimeter of the hole, it takes less effort.

hole-hawg-kit.jpg
 
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For all water hole sizes use a 1-3/8 bit. that is the size that all the tube supports / grommets fit into for holding water pipes secure 1/2-1" copper tube size pipe, which CPVC is.

I use the Milwaukee Big Hawg hole saws for all my waste holes. 1.5-3"... They do have a 4-5/8 bit available for this as well. These bits eat wood but because they only remove the perimeter of the hole, it takes less effort.

View attachment 79606
Perfect!! Exactly the information I was looking for. That set is pricey but it looks like I would never need to buy another lol.
One question though, What is the application difference between the 2-1/8" and the 2-9/16" holes?
 

Tuttles Revenge

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2-1/8 is for 1-1/2" pipe.. 2-9/16 is for 2" pipe. Outside diameters. I prefer a 2-1/4 for 1.5" but... it works.
 

jadnashua

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Whatever you do, you don't want the hole tight, especially on waste and hot supply lines. The temperature changes of pipes when the pipe expands and contracts will be a constant annoyance as it creaks and pops!
 

Jeff H Young

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For water drill 1 3/8" bit and use a trisulater insert 1 1/2 pipe 2 1/8" 2 " pipe 2 9/16 bit 3 inch 3 5/8 inch on the electricians work perhaps 7/8" bit
 

Reach4

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why is anyone still using CPVC these days with the affordability and durability of PEX? asking for a friend and all that :x
No special tool needed. You can go farther between supports. Maybe something else that does not come to mind.
 

breplum

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We also carry every size hole saw in the Lenox classic multi tooth hole saws in case we need to drill through f'ck'n nails.
Plumbers have a inborn ability to locate every hole where a nail is hidden, and it is best to not use a lot of three tooth action on nails.
I also keep a diamond disc mounted on a drill to sharpen the carbide tips.
shopping
 
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why is anyone still using CPVC these days with the affordability and durability of PEX? asking for a friend and all that :x
I actually wondered this as well. Shortly after moving in to this home 5 years ago I took it upon myself to replace the old galvanized pipe in the crawl space. At the time I honestly was a lot less concerned with codes and just getting the work done because I knew that I had plans to remodel everything and this was just a stopgap. For the main supply runs I used 3/4" CPVC mostly because I felt it was easier for the long straight runs down the house. I did 3/4" x 1/2" tees off of that and adapted it to 1/2" PEX to do the connections to the various fixtures in the house. I used sharkbites which was expensive but pretty darn easy to get it done fast.

Last year, I did a remodel on the main bathroom. I hired a plumber to do the rough in. I did not really ask why, maybe just old school, maybe other reasons, but when he did his thing he took out all of the PEX and replaced it with CPVC and handed me a bag with all of my sharkbite fittings.

Now I am preparing plans for a permit to do the remainder of the house remodel. I do not plan to pay for the plumber this time. I figured if a pro plumber used CPVC maybe I should as well. If nothing else, just to keep everything consistent.
 

Mr tee

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For 1 3/8" holes a spade bit will work if you aren't going to make a career out of drilling holes.
 

Jeff H Young

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No special tool needed. You can go farther between supports. Maybe something else that does not come to mind.
Looks cleaner than a spaghetti of PEX might be reason too.. I think its cheaper too but not sure . I'm sure there are people that have had success with CPVC and trust it ( I'm not crazy about it ) but an example is my moms house in Palm Coast Florida has been without a problem for 25 years I think built around 95 or 97. I'm aware of a hotel built for Disney that runs schedule 80 CPVC mains with propress copper going to the rooms I think that might be a reliable system.
 

Mr tee

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I have seen pallet boxes of sch 80 fittings at Las Vegas hotel building sites. (The water there is nasty).
 

jadnashua

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CPVC tends to get brittle as it gets old, but PEX also has issues if you don't protect it from UV exposure. IMHO, most water supply lines end up inside of a wall, so you can't see them, so looks aren't as important. One of the big benefits of PEX is that you don't need to use lots of fittings unless you're obsessive about it looking neat, but then, you can create flow issues because of the restrictions of their fittings that you don't get with CPVC where the fittings are external rather than internal.
 

WorthFlorida

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My home built in 2006-07 time frame is 100% CPVC. PVC for DWV. The plumber you had hired, CPVC assembly is the same as copper. Clean all joints and use the proper cement and that fitting will never come apart. The ID of all fittings is no less than the pipe ID itself. For PEX, most fittings (non shark-bite type) have a smaller ID and some PEX fittings had past failures.

I had hired two different plumbers too rough in two bath remodeling projects. Each cut out the CPVC and converted to PEX for the shower/tub valve bodies. Going from one to two sinks in one bathroom, the plumber switched over to PEX. I think it comes down to what the plumber is comfortable. You could probably argue all day what is better, copper, CPVC or PEX. Each has their advantages.
 

jadnashua

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FWIW, there's an internal stiffener in a SharkBite. If used on copper, you can remove it, but it must be left in place when using PEX. If you don't remove it, it will fit inside of copper, but it will reduce the ID of the pipe through the fitting. if it's left in place. SharkBite Installation Instructions 2020
 
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For all water hole sizes use a 1-3/8 bit. that is the size that all the tube supports / grommets fit into for holding water pipes secure 1/2-1" copper tube size pipe, which CPVC is.

I use the Milwaukee Big Hawg hole saws for all my waste holes. 1.5-3"... They do have a 4-5/8 bit available for this as well. These bits eat wood but because they only remove the perimeter of the hole, it takes less effort.

View attachment 79606
At the risk of sounding like a total idiot could you explain when you choose to use either the 3/8" spade or the pre installed arbor pilot bit?
Also, what is the diamond file for? Sharpening the hole saw teeth? Is there a "how to" on that somewhere? lol.
 
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