Sump Pump Check Valve on Washing Laundry Machine

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JoeThomas

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I am a resident and my apartment manager purchased a Everbuilt THD1020 (In-Line Sump Pump Check Valve) , and installed in the back hose of our washing machine. The back hose would leak detergent soap and water. Is it a good practice to install In-Line check valves like this on laundry machines? The original hose kept leaking water/soap, so decided to add this.

** My main question is, does it make dirt/waste come back into the washing machine itself, and dirty the clothes more. I am a resident and curious about this.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbil...-Line-Sump-Pump-Check-Valve-THD1020/205616001

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Tuttles Revenge

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The most likely reason that water was coming out of the drains is because they're clogged up steel drains. Likely need to be snaked / jetted clean.

The check valves are not going to cause dirty water to back into the clothes washers in my opinion.. but they may cause some issue with pressurizing the old drains.

Hmm... on second thought the washers likely have a check valve built into them.. but the check valves installed arent going to close in a vertical position.. So essentially they serve no purpose other than to seal the connection between the hose and the drain. The flapper is going to hang down all of the time.
 

JoeThomas

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The most likely reason that water was coming out of the drains is because they're clogged up steel drains. Likely need to be snaked / jetted clean.

The check valves are not going to cause dirty water to back into the clothes washers in my opinion.. but they may cause some issue with pressurizing the old drains.

Hmm... on second thought the washers likely have a check valve built into them.. but the check valves installed arent going to close in a vertical position.. So essentially they serve no purpose other than to seal the connection between the hose and the drain. The flapper is going to hang down all of the time.
how about the second question here? Thanks !
"does it make dirt/waste come back into the washing machine itself, and dirty the clothes more. I am a resident and curious about this." I am a resident and curious about this. I was telling my apartment manager to look into this article, about why its leaking. Anyways, my main concern is how it'll affect clothing cleanliness or quality . https://www.artplumbingandac.com/plumbing/what-to-do-about-a-leaking-washing-machine-hose/
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Its really difficult to gauge how something is going to work when its installed wrong. I don't have much experience with things that are installed wrong because I don't install them that way.

I don't see how installing check valves upside down so that the flappers just hang open would cause dirty water to drain back into the machine. The one thing that could help make that happen is the fact that the hose is now sealed to the drain. and if a second machine is pumping and the drain is clogged, then it could push back into the other machine.. if the machines don't have their own check valves.

If I were you I would look at the make/model of the washing machine to verify whether it has its own check valve built in to the drain.. which seems most likely. That would be the device that keeps dirty water from entering the machine.
 

wwhitney

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Surely an airgap is required at that connection and sealing the hose to the standpipe violates the plumbing code.

Cheers, Wayne
 

JoeThomas

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Its really difficult to gauge how something is going to work when its installed wrong. I don't have much experience with things that are installed wrong because I don't install them that way.

I don't see how installing check valves upside down so that the flappers just hang open would cause dirty water to drain back into the machine. The one thing that could help make that happen is the fact that the hose is now sealed to the drain. and if a second machine is pumping and the drain is clogged, then it could push back into the other machine.. if the machines don't have their own check valves.

If I were you I would look at the make/model of the washing machine to verify whether it has its own check valve built in to the drain.. which seems most likely. That would be the device that keeps dirty water from entering the machine.
Thanks ! In the picture, each washing machine has its own back hose and own check valve, so not sure if second paragraph can occur.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Surely an airgap is required at that connection and sealing the hose to the standpipe violates the plumbing code.

Cheers, Wayne
Good question. How does a clothes washer handle cross contamination where a dishwasher can't? Clothes washers are always installed with their hoses tucked into the drain whether that's a standpipe or hooked over a laundry sink. The water must enter above a flood level inside the machine somehow.
 
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