Standpipe or Clog?

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Jharse

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My washer overfills from the standpipe. Do I need to extend the standpipe or should I call someone to snake it out? If I extend the standpipe, I would need a longer hose for the washer. From what I've been reading online, my P trap is higher off the ground than most. Any suggestions would be helpful.
 

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MACPLUMB

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You need to get a professional drain person to power snake the drain out, raising the stand pipe will not solve the problem
unless you raise above the roof line ha ha
 

FullySprinklered

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Hereabouts, a washer stand pipe would be 24" to pass code. With good reason. There are things you could do to make it work, but your connection is way too high for a decent normal install.
 

Jharse

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Hereabouts, a washer stand pipe would be 24" to pass code. With good reason. There are things you could do to make it work, but your connection is way too high for a decent normal install.
I was noticing the connection was higher than in other pictures. What would you suggest? I was thinking about just calling a plumber if adding more height to the standpipe wouldn't immediately fix it
 

Reach4

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I was noticing the connection was higher than in other pictures. What would you suggest? I was thinking about just calling a plumber if adding more height to the standpipe wouldn't immediately fix it
I would go up about 30 inches above the trap, and get a hose extension from the washer if needed.
 

Nolan

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You have to be careful about how high you run the washer discharge. Make sure you check the manual for your washer to see the maximum height the pump can handle.
 

FullySprinklered

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If you're going way high, you may need a check valve on the drain pipe. The dirty water will want to run back down into the machine unless you mitigate it somehow. Guy I used to work for did it a number of times, but upon inspection it wouldn't pass a few counties east of here. I did a washer drain into a surge tank at the customer's request. The existing exit to the old septic system was slow, but it worked with the gradual drainage from the surge tank into the system. Not inspected. The rest of the house had been connected to the city sewer system and it was fine. The washer was in the basement and was lower than the city connection. Look up "surge tank" online and see if that might work for you. We made this tank out of a square plastic storage container from HD. Drilled a hole in the bottom with a hole saw and used a rubber washer and a 1.5 male adapter and a matching electrical lock nut and glued pvc pipe into that and connected that into the old septic system. The tank was suspended from the basement ceiling joists using 2x boards to make a platform for it.
 

MKS

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If it worked before then it would seem a clog or restriction is likely. That is assuming the original installation is correct.
 
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