Source of 7/8" IPS fittings

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by zimm0who0net, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:33 PM.

  1. zimm0who0net

    zimm0who0net Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2009
    Location:
    Arizona
    So I'm retrofitting a toilet valve as a fill for my pool. From the bottom of the valve I need to make a 180 degree turn so the supply can come from above the waterline. Easy, right? Just get two 3/4" PVC elbows and we're done! Too bad, the toilet valve standard uses a 7/8" IPS (14 threads per inch, straight) standard that apparently was phased out in 1923 but still remains in this, and only this application. The only thing I can find that actually threads onto that port is a standard braided hose, but I simply don't have enough room to have the straight down braided hose turn 180 degrees (plus I'd have to come up with some other method of securing the valve if it's not potted into a piece of PVC).

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    There are "rigid" lines that can be bent with a tubing bender. I suggest you describe better what spacing you have to deal with. A drawing/sketch would be good, as would a photo.
    [​IMG]
    The above is a chrome plated copper supply line for toilets. It's 3/8 od, and connects to a compression fitting.

    You should be able to bend it easily enough.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018 at 2:55 PM
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  4. zimm0who0net

    zimm0who0net Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2009
    Location:
    Arizona
    Here's a link to a quick photo I drew up. https://imgur.com/a/LMnDEpl

    I only have about 1" of clearance between the bottom of the threads on the valve and the floor of the skimmer box.

    If you're interested I'll elaborate on what I'm doing here. The box currently has a typical float fill valve (like a swamp cooler) installed in the "water supply" port. That works just fine when connected to city water because it just sits there and drips into the pool 24/7. I'm switching to a rainwater fill system that's lower than my pool, so it's driven off a very small pump. When I hooked it up, it wasn't pretty as the low flow rate of the float valve didn't sync well with the pump. Even with the addition of a pressure tank I ended up with the pump cycling on and off all day long.

    The problem here is the float switch flows great when the level is very low, but the flow rate slows dramatically as the fill level comes up to the desired position. That's probably why they don't use float valves in toilets. Anyway, I searched for a valve that flowed much faster and snapped off when reaching a predesignated point and thought a toilet valve would be perfect (albeit it's nearly impossible to find specs on the flow rate of a toilet valve). That way I'll flow like crazy, and run the pump at full blast right to the point that I'm full, and then I'll stop the flow completely. Just like a toilet!

    Another thought here would be a side entry toilet valve like this but I've never seen one of these locally and I have no clue as to how fast these things flow and if they "snap" off like a typical bottom entry toilet valve.
     
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Here is a search engine search that might help you: ballcock elbow

    Note that Sharkbite and John Guest 1/2 inch side can push onto CPVC, which you could adapt to PVC. They also go onto PEX.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 6, 2018 at 6:22 PM
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