Silly well production question

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog. Water is life.' started by stormlight, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. stormlight

    stormlight New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Location:
    CA
    Hello, I have a well that I just dug. It is sandy soil (6 blocks away from a beach). I dug 10 foot down and hit very wet sand that when pulled out turns into a small pool of water. I then excavated another 10 feet of sand that turned into a pool of standing 10 foot of water.

    Two questions

    1. If i were to hook up a sprinkler pump and pull the water out of the well, does this mean I can only pump out 10 feet of water and then I have to wait for the excavated area to recharge with water? Or is there a possibility as I am pumping other water will pull into the well and keep feeding the pump?

    2. This is the question I feel stupid asking. However, in theory if i would have kept digging is there some magical pool of water that is freestanding not in sand? Like a underground stream that I should have tried to reach? Or is that not common?

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    There is a good possibility that the water will keep up with a moderate pumping rate.

    Uncommon.

    Be careful that your water is not salty if you are planning to irrigate with it.
     
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  4. stormlight

    stormlight New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2018
    Location:
    CA
    Thank you for such a quick reply ! Would you mind telling me what you would consider a moderate pump rate just so I have some point of reference? For example is 1-10GPM low, 10-20 GPM moderate, above 20GPM high?

    Thanks again
     
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    I was thinking 5 to 10 gpm, but it could be way different.

    I suggest that you draw some water with a bucket. Let solids settle. Boil some of the water. Let it cool. Taste the water. If salty, I would expect it to be bad for your plants. You can get a lab test to put numbers on it.
     
  6. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    You need at least 5 GPM to supply a house. But even 1 GPM is 1440 gallons per day, you will just need a storage tank and booster pump to be able to use it at 5+ GPM as needed. But if all you are needing the water for is to irrigate with a 3 GPM sprinkler, then 3 GPM is all the well needs to produce.
     
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Forum Title Date
Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog. Water is life. Low water production Dec 19, 2007

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