Seeking to put in new tank. Have lots of of questions.

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog. Water is life.' started by Leilaf, Jul 31, 2018.

  1. Leilaf

    Leilaf New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2018
    Location:
    Louisiana
    I have been lingering here for a while. Thanks to all for the great info! I am now comfortable enough with my little knowledge to ask for help.

    I have a pump system that was installed about 10 years ago. It has a Wellmate 86 gallon tank that is now leaking and a submersible pump that I am not familiar with. I can’t get in touch with the installers to find out what they put in. I owned the property when this work was done but I knew nothing about pumps and wells. I was given no manuals or info. The installation was done outside and all I have done for maintenance is to protect it from freezing in the winter time. There is a building about 15 ft from the location of the well. I am thinking about running the pipe from the wellhead underground into the building, and setting up a CSV with a small tank inside the building. I was advised against using a csv by a local well pump supplier but after reading a lot in this forum I decided to do this anyway myself. The job that was done by the contractor left a lot to be desired. I have a few questions.

    I would like to know the benefit of having a 10 gallon tank versus a 4.5 gallon tank, if any, since supposedly a bigger tank is a waste of money. The water gets small amounts of sand in it sometimes. If I collect five gallons of water and let it settle, I might get a few grains of sand at the bottom. I wonder if this contributed to the early demise of my water tank as I was told it would last 20 years. I am thinking of putting in a sediment filter. Should I put it in before the csv or after? My water is acidic and eats up copper and brass. I believe the csv and fittings come in stainless but the 4.5 and 10 gallon tanks obviously are not. Will the acidic water hurt my tank? I am trying to avoid adding an alkalizing filter, but if I have to, I will. Yet we love the taste of our water and the way a shower feels! I think it is because of the acidity of the water that most people use fiberglass tanks around here.

    Do I need to know the size of my pump? It was installed for a two bedroom home in the country. If I do, is there a way to approximate the size of pump by its current draw? A twenty amp double pole breaker feeds this thing and it has never tripped. I measured 4.5 to 5.5 amps draw on 240 volts. This leads me to believe it is either a 1/2 or 3/4 hp pump. Does it matter for csv pressure or tank sizing? Also, most wells around here are about 100 to 150 feet deep.

    Two last things. I want to put in a valved bypass around the csv for use in case of a fire to hook up a fire hose with unimpeded flow while a firetruck gets here, which takes a long time! Neighbors had a scare once. That truck took forever!

    And finally, I am renovating an old cabin about 90 feet away I want to use as a rental. I would like to run that off the same system. This might imply needing a variable csv so I can change pressure down the road, and/or adding another tank, or it may be cheaper just to get a larger tank up front. There would only be a single person or couple living there. But I would hate to lose pressure in our house once that little house is finished.

    Any suggestions on how to best accomplish these goals would be greatly appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
  2. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    5.5 amps means it is a 1/2HP. 100-150 feet deep probably means a 5-7 GPM pump. If nothing else discussing a CSV with a local well guy will let you know his level of intelligence or lack thereof. Not much difference between the 4.5 or 10 gallon tank in your case. An 80 gallon tank only holds 20 gallons of water. A 10 gallon tank holds 2 and a 4.5 gallon tank only holds 1 gallon of water. But your water comes from the well, not the tank. All the tank is for is to keep the pump from cycling too much, and when you have a CSV to do that for you, a large tank is not needed. These kind of tanks are plastic lined on the inside so water nevere touches metal.

    And the CSV will not impede flow for a fire truck. Anytime you open enough faucets to get the pressure below the setting of the CSV, it turns into a piece of pipe and does not impede flow. You don't need a bypass, but a generator would be smart. Fire usually gets the electric power first.
     
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  4. Leilaf

    Leilaf New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2018
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Thank you Valveman, for your prompt and informative reply. I am ordering my valve and tank soon. I have a generator in that little building. But I never about how ready it needs to be! So having a sediment filter before the tank and csv is ok? I am thinking I do not want sediment eroding my tank!
     
  5. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    As long as the filter is rated for 100 PSI or more you can put it anywhere you want. But I normally recommend filters after the pressure tank/pressure switch.
     
  6. Leilaf

    Leilaf New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2018
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Ok. Thank you.
     
  7. MaxBlack

    MaxBlack Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    Caution: You do not want the sediment filter in a position where plugging can cause the well pump to become "dead-headed". Make sure that you have a Pressure Relief Valve installed ahead of the filter.
     
  8. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Actually we do sediment filters ahead of the pressure switch all the time. As long as 1 GPM can still pass through the sediment, it won't hurt the pump. But if you have iron or something slimy that could completely plug a filter, I don't recommend putting it before the pressure switch/pressure tank.
     
  9. MaxBlack

    MaxBlack Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    Ok but 1gpm is not readily observable yes? Just yesterday I was looking at a neighbor’s cheap plastic filter housing w/no PRV and guage reading over 100psi (he’d complained “no water!”). Took me a few minutes to determine what I was looking at (had never seen their wellhead) and realize the pump was running. Shut it off immediately.

    Only later did I realize that filter housing might have burst in my face...though hopefully they are greatly underrated at 100psi.
     
  10. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Yeah you have to check the pressure rating of the filter. But even clogged like that is was letting at least 1 GPM through to keep the pump and motor cool. So wasn't going to hurt anything.
     
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