Sediment cleanout (airlift pump) before installing submersible well?

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Whereismyhat

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I just pulled my dead submersible well pump. The new one is coming in a week or so. In the down time, I got to ponder the reason for my pump failure. I was wondering if it could have been due to sediment build up. It's been over 20 years so it could as equally be age....

My water has always come out clear and free of sediment, even the the very last moment before the pump died. However, after pulling it up, I noticed a small film of dark greyish mud caking over the side of the pump.

The PVC drop pipe was for the most part very clean minus the brown iron staining on the outside of the pvc submerged below the water. It was installed with a two check valves, one about 10 feet above the pump and one about 30 feet below the pitless adapter. Total length of drop pipe is 180 feet. I think water level is 150 (depth I need to measure). As we were cutting away the pvc as we pulled, the water on the inside that was released from the check valves was completely clear.

Interestingly, when the pump was finally pulled out and set on the ground, the discharge head broke off. It was then I noticed the white chalk on the inside. One of the blades (circled in red) was a quarter way full of the chalk in a paste like consistency. I was wondering is this is something I need to be concerned with. I have seem some of the forum posts describe how some sediment is removed using an airlift pump. In my case, I am wondering if it's more trouble than its worth. One company I called to get a quote said that I shouldn't even consider it since it could cause a collapse at the bottom of my well.

Do I need to clean it out? or is this what I should have expected for a pump of this age?
 

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Reach4

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What is that in the https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?attachments/dscf7423-jpg.86420/ photo? Is that a spool-type pitless? O ring(s) seem to be missing.

Or was that what the pump was hanging from? I am leaning toward that -- the top of the motor.

After putting things back together, you will want to run to the ditch for a while to clear sediment. Then sanitize.

So regarding the airlift pump, you pretty much need for the static water line to be half way up or more.

The fast way to clear sediment is with a big engine-powered compressor. You blow, and sediment+water gushes up like a geyser.
 

Whereismyhat

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What is that in the https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?attachments/dscf7423-jpg.86420/ photo? Is that a spool-type pitless? O ring(s) seem to be missing.

Or was that what the pump was hanging from? I am leaning toward that -- the top of the motor.

After putting things back together, you will want to run to the ditch for a while to clear sediment. Then sanitize.

So regarding the airlift pump, you pretty much need for the static water line to be half way up or more.

The fast way to clear sediment is with a big engine-powered compressor. You blow, and sediment+water gushes up like a geyser.
It's the top of the pump. The discharge head the broke off when we tossed it on the ground. I already know what pump I need to replace it. It was a 3/4 HP Red jacket 12G12.

My issue is deciding if I need to worry about/consider clearing out the sediment though, or if what I pulled out looks pretty normal.
 

Whereismyhat

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I know it's well cased, but if you mean the very bottom, I would imagine not. I think the well driller here mentioned they don't because its recharging the water from the limestone.
 

Whereismyhat

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I need to double check, but I think I was told it was cased to like 200 and drilled to 230.

@Valveman just curious, under what conditions would it be "ok" to clean it out with an airlift pump?

Also, are the residues I am looking at pretty standard and expected from my old pump? One company said yes, and there was nothing to be concerned about and to go ahead and drop the new pump in. Another company said no, and that I need a clean out. So now I am of two minds, even if you say its not advisable.

Presumably the chalk is just calcium carbonate particulate. I don't have any black usually indicative of manganese. I know I have quite a bit of ferrous iron. I presume the slightly grey paste/film/sludge is just silt or clay mixed in with the chalk?
 
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Reach4

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I suspect it is cased to the bottom, but with a screen of some sort at the bottom or on the way. There may be clay layers, and clay layers do not do well when uncased.
 
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