Safe way to even out bottom of new toilet

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JAS68

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Hello. I have a new Kohler Wellworth I'm about to install. I got it online and had to get the tank redelivered because the first came in probably 100 pieces. Given that distraction, I carefully inspected the bowl upon delivery and deemed it perfectly acceptable.

Now that I'm preparing for the installation, I notice that there are 2 fairly obvious glazing drips that protrude below the mostly level perimeter of the base. If I just sit the bowl on my level tile floor, i rocks noticeably, but not to the point where I think it can't be stabilized.

So I'm wondering whether it's safe to try to grind or file those drips down, in order to keep shimming to a minimum. I don't want to risk breaking or weakening the bowl, but if there's a reasonable way to do this, I'd love any advice.

Thanks
 

JAS68

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If I take this article at its word, it seems like it might be safe enough for me to use my angle grinder with diamond blade (I've used this to cut all manner of stone, brick, etc) and a spray bottle. I'm looking at taking off probably maximum 1/8" of material in 2 penny-sized spots, so really a very minor amount of material. So I'm thinking this is safe to try, but again, any feedback is welcome.
 

Reach4

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It is normal to need shims to prevent a toilet from rocking.

The shims should be positioned by setting the toilet down first with no wax. Position the shims, and cut to length. Lift the toilet, drop the wax, and drop the toilet.

Then use acrylic caulk, such as polyseamseal, around the front 85% of the toilet. Use the search box above for polyseamseal to see discussions.
 

Sylvan

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I will never install or service a Kohler fixture . I happen to like quality over "the Bold look"

Having installed several thousand Gerber and Crane toilets without a single call back is what plumbers and home owners love to hear

When someone buys a fixture and has to make modification that will void any type of warrantee this shows the "Quality" maybe questionable IMHO

I lost count on how many Kohler Rialto toilets I replaced with Gerber Avalanche

Some of my accounts are commercial and schools and nursing homes and a callback is not an option as I am only as good as my last job

I told my employees in 1982 " Your only as good as your last job" "If we do a good job the clients will tell three people ,If we do lousy job they will tell everyone we used inferior materials and poor workmanship"

This is my opinion with over 53 YEARS in the plumbing profession
 

Sylvan

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"It is normal to need shims to prevent a toilet from rocking"

On a TUB yes I used shims made for tubs looks like a door stop

If the floor flange is set improperly or there high spots on the tiles then plaster of Paris used under a toilet works wonders in leveling it out and less change of the fixture cracking as a shim will place too much weight on it and China is not known for load bearing weight

See SHIM below

shopping
 

Reach4

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"It is normal to need shims to prevent a toilet from rocking"

On a TUB yes I used shims made for tubs looks like a door stop
If you set a floor-mounted toilet in mortar or plaster of Paris, then no shims needed. Those seem to only be done in specific areas, but they are certainly effective at preventing rocking.
 

WorthFlorida

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Over two years I had two different licensed plumbers to remodel two bathrooms. Both asked for grout to set the toilets. They put down a bed of grout, just like motor, set the toilet level then snug down the bolts. Any grout that gets squeezed out is push back under the toilet and smooth out with a damp rag or sponge. The grout used was MAPEI premixed grout from about a 5 lb. bucket. This is in central Florida. One plumber was a Floridian, the other was from Long Island, NY and trained in the family business.
 

Reach4

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Oooh... grout looks better than mortar for this.
https://www.thespruce.com/difference-between-cement-concrete-and-mortar-2130884 says
Grout is a similar product that can be seen as a form of mortar, but formulated without the lime additive. Mortar has a higher water content to allow it to flow and fill gaps between ceramic and stone tiles. Because of its high water content, grout is not a binding material, but serves merely to fill gaps.​
 

JAS68

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Thanks for all of the advice. 1) I just did grind down the couple of drips, no problem, so that's that. I will shim as needed and caulk the perimeter, minus the back. I'm not going to grout on top of my tile, at least not at this point.

As for choice of Kohler, taking a little bit of a risk, but I'll see how it goes. I would install a Drake II in a heartbeat, but needed 14" offset (which the Kohler solves with a deep tank, not a difference in where the horn is). I was looking at a Vespin II, but was a bit down on the elevated price over a Drake plus the fact that I'd have to buy a separate Unifit 14" adapter and drill into the floor to install. I'm all in on Toto, but in this case, it seemed like the Kohler could be the better bet. The proof will be in the flushing after it's all installed.
 

Jadnashua

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Grout may look good, but boy are you asking for big problems if you even want to remove the toilet! I'm not sure that grout would meet the plumbing requirement some places have for sealing around the toilet to prevent crud from getting underneath. Grout is not waterproof and will, or at least can, absorb stuff. Grout is essentially a good adhesive. Yes, caulk can be, too, but it's generally a smaller bead, and not underneath the whole bottom rim, and can be cut easier than trying to break the bond with grout.
 

JAS68

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Installed, did not need shimming, and caulked (not grouted). I'd say the flush isn't quite as convincing as my old Drake, but not at all bad. Definitely an improvement over the old Jacuzzi model we inherited with the house.
 
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