Removing leaded CI cleanout plug and extend with ABS/PVC

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Cornelius, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. Cornelius

    Cornelius New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2019
    Location:
    Idaho
    Hello, long time reader, first time poster.
    I recently moved into a home in Idaho that was built around 1970 (our jurisdiction uses UPC). The house utilizes a septic tank that sits relatively high; The main waste drain leading from the house to the septic tank sits about 40” or so off of the floor of the basement (see pictures below). The line and clean out are cast iron 3x3x3 Combo (not sure if this is the correct terminologyfor CI fittings). The clean out plug is a brass 2 1/2” fitted into a steel 2 1/2x3” threaded bushing that has been leaded into the flange of the CI.

    One of the previous owners had replaced all of the house drain plumbing with ABS, and created a diagonal soil stack off of the CI cleanout combo, which then transitions to vertical. (The stack is then vented out the top with 2” ABS.)

    The Cleanout/stack is located in a relatively large utility room, which is a poorly utilized space; we are planning on redesigning the space to add a bathroom to the basement utilizing a sewage ejector. (Will be breaking up the floor to install in ground drain piping) the utility room also houses the laundry units

    In order to accomplish our redesign we would like to move the washer dryer to the orange wall, shown in the pictures below, requiring a new laundry standpipe to be installed. The current standpipe sits relatively high due to the current design of the houses main waste stack. Which leads me to my first questions:


    1. Is there any issue with removing the clean out plug (as mentioned it is leaded in place, so will have to be cut out) and then using a Fernco donut in in the CI fitting to a drive 3” ABS stub, and then adding an ABS Wye (equipped with new cleanout of course)?

    2. Is there a better option?


    This wye will be used to install my sewage ejector discharge pipe.

    I would also like to use the branch from this wye to run a new trapped and vented laundry standpipe. The current laundry standpipe is pretty high off of the ground, so much so that the washer’s permanently installed drain hose, barely reaches into the stack (forget about connecting an air gap). The current standpipe is also shorter thank 18”, due to this issue. The new laundry stack would sit at a point where the laundry drain line would easily reach without strain. (Pedestals aren’t an option as the units will be stacked, and the ceiling height is only 7ft).

    8FF4DBB1-C7E8-4140-AABC-231F1B6F7268.jpeg 04933B22-DCBD-4110-A533-8B334C21F81A.jpeg 57DA2AE9-EE9D-4B3D-96CA-C3A7C25CDAB0.jpeg
    47AB7D1C-9765-43EE-9B77-70A59834B56B.jpeg

    The other option (maybe the correct one) would be to install a new laundry standpipe closet to the floor which would instead drain into the new sewage ejector pit. This would allow me to install the laundry drain stacks at a code prescribed height, but I’m not convinced this is the best option; I’ve been mentally opting not to do this to mitigate dumping additional sand/grit into the sewage ejector.

    3. Should I be concerned with laundry grit being dumped into the sewage ejector?

    I’m sure I’ll have some additional questions as my project progresses. Thanks in advance!

    I apologize in advance if this is covered elsewhere, I searched the forum and was unable to locate similar threads (I’m certain this question has come up before).
     
  2. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida ?

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Orlando, Florida
    It looks like you’re too high. See the Lincoln link below. What is the injector pump for? If it not for a toilet you can use it for the washing machine. It’d be much easier to install. For a toilet use a separate macerated. These systems do need venting. I’ll hold judgement on your pipe extension since I’m not a plumber but it does looks correct except the heigh for the washing machine discharge.

    https://www.saniflostore.com/Saniflo-Macerators_c21.htm

    https://www.saniflostore.com/Sanifl...8C8TzbNFiRSflyiM7fqDZs4FFKwuVjuxoCgoEQAvD_BwE

    http://www.co.lincoln.or.us/sites/d..._-_helpful_hints_residential_construction.pdf
     
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  4. Cornelius

    Cornelius New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2019
    Location:
    Idaho
    Thanks worthFlorida, that’s a nice little guide that Lincoln provided. To clarify, yes, the sewage ejector pit will be used for a 3/4 bathroom. Toilet, sink, shower, and another sink will all be all be plumbed to the ejector pit.


    Is there an issue with running both a toilet and a washer into the same sewage ejector pump basin (besides issues concerning required/available pump flow rate)?
     
  5. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida ?

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Orlando, Florida
    I do not know much about about these but recently at my brothers VT camp the pump in the macerator would occasionally not run. I think he had the shower and sink connected to it. So when it failed the entire bathroom was useless. With two pumps system, each designed for a different purpose, should one fail you don’t lose everything.

    Look at the specs of each type and installation is slightly different. They show a picture with the washer draining into a utility sink. With the pump below it. I think the discharge from the washer overwhelms the pump for a minute or two and the sink just holds it back as an overflow. A good setup. The macerator spec sheet does show a bathtub and sink use but it doesn’t mention washers.

    You should call a dealer or the manufacture on these pumps for better info. I’m sure the design of the impeller are different between the pumps. The spec sheets recommends certain heights, etc. and venting is very import.

    My brother laid down 2x8” on the concrete floor and sat the toilet and shower on it. There is PEX radiant heat in the concrete so he could not cut the floor. When you walk into the bath the sink is at floor level and one step up for the rest.

    https://www.saniflo.com/en/module/attachment123/attachment?id=69

    https://www.saniflostore.com/Saniflo-Saniplus-2-002.htm
     
  6. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    For a toilet, you would want a grinder pump in the pit. Those pumps are built to change big solids into small, as well as do pumping.
     
  7. Cornelius

    Cornelius New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2019
    Location:
    Idaho
    Reach4, the house is on a septic tank with septic drainage field. Everything I have read has cautioned against using a mascerating pump. Reason being that mascerators break solids down into a slurry, the small particles of which will pass right through the solids collection tank and directly into the drainage field along with the liquid, causing plugging and premature failure of the drainage field. Sewage ejector pumps pass solids that are largely whole; I already have the pump system spec’d out for the bathroom waste.

    Considering purchasing a laundry pump/sink and just running the washer discharge to that and pumping up to the stack.
     
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