Removing Culligan Super S filter control unit and bypass valve from tank

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Mark McKenzie

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I want to replace the sand and carbon media in the tank and reseal this older unit for my Dad. I've read all the threads here on this model and watched all the YouTube videos I could find, and have downloaded the Super S installation/operators manual from several sources... But none of them explain how to properly disassemble the control unit/pump. All the manual PDF files I downloaded are missing page 10... which explains how the pump and control unit is attached to the bypass valve and bracket. I'm pretty mechanically inclined, but looking at the unit I can't see how/what order these components are assembled.... don't want to destroy/break anything. Also, once I expose the three threaded pipes that everything attaches to on the tank, how do I go about removing the old filter media ?
 

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OK.. Figured out how to remove the control assembly and bypass valve... just disconnected the plastic tubes from the tank and unscrewed the three stainless bolts from the bracket and a few of small screws holding the bypass valve onto the black plastic manifold, pulled the bypass valve out, and then the entire control/compressor/pump assembly easily slid off the slotted black and white tank tube fittings .

Now I need to figure out how to remove the old filter media from the tank. I'm thinking of rigging a 1/2" dia length of PVC pipe to my shop vac, pumping clean water from a hose down one tube while sucking the old media out with the vac from the other.
 

Reach4

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How about removing the water, remove the distributor tube, put a drum liner or big garbage bag over the top, tipping over the tank, lifting the bottom of the tank.

To remove the water, how about a 5/8 OD flex tube down the distributor tube, and siphoning out the water. The wet vac could help start the siphon, or maybe you could just suck on the tube with the vac with the help of your hand or tape to create a sufficient seal. You could also use your mouth to start the siphon.

I have never done it, and I am not a pro.

I was thinking the Super S used Centaur Carbon, but I am certainly not sure.
 

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OK.. Figured out how to remove the control assembly and bypass valve... just disconnected the plastic tubes from the tank and unscrewed the three stainless bolts from the bracket and a few of small screws holding the bypass valve onto the black plastic manifold, pulled the bypass valve out, and then the entire control/compressor/pump assembly easily slid off the slotted black and white tank tube fittings .

Now I need to figure out how to remove the old filter media from the tank. I'm thinking of rigging a 1/2" dia length of PVC pipe to my shop vac, pumping clean water from a hose down one tube while sucking the old media out with the vac from the other.

I'm pretty sure there's some type of strainer at the bottom of the main/pickup tube... and I hope the backflush/regen one is open. Need to know which tube is which before I cram anything down them...
 

Reach4

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I'm pretty sure there's some type of strainer at the bottom of the main/pickup tube... and I hope the backflush/regen one is open.
There is such a strainer. It is commonly known as the lower distributor basket. By running a smaller tube or pipe down the distributor tube, that strainer will be between your media and your tube opening. Thus you will be only removing water.

Given some muscle, you could just tip the tank over gently, and spill it all out -- water and all.
 

Mark McKenzie

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How about removing the water, remove the distributor tube, put a drum liner or big garbage bag over the top, tipping over the tank, lifting the bottom of the tank.

To remove the water, how about a 5/8 OD flex tube down the distributor tube, and siphoning out the water. The wet vac could help start the siphon, or maybe you could just suck on the tube with the vac with the help of your hand or tape to create a sufficient seal. You could also use your mouth to start the siphon.

I have never done it, and I am not a pro.

I was thinking the Super S used Centaur Carbon, but I am certainly not sure.

Good idea. Both tubes are only about 1" inner diameter, though. And the waterlogged tank weighs over 100 lb... too heavy for me to lift. And yes, I learned this model uses both a coarse sand bedding and 1 - 1/2 cubic foot of Centaur carbon media .
 

Mark McKenzie

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There is such a strainer. It is commonly known as the lower distributor basket. By running a smaller tube or pipe down the distributor tube, that strainer will be between your media and your tube opening. Thus you will be only removing water.

Given some muscle, you could just tip the tank over gently, and spill it all out -- water and all.

I'm going to enlist another set of hands and give your last suggestion a try. We'll prop the bottom of the tank up to about a 15 degree incline with the 'open' tube at the lowest point down... and see what comes out. We'll try forcing hose water up into the distributer tube to flush the media/sand out if we have to.

Thanks for your help !
 

Reach4

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Good idea. Both tubes are only about 1" inner diameter, though. And the waterlogged tank weighs over 100 lb... too heavy for me to lift. And yes, I learned this model uses both a coarse sand bedding and 1 - 1/2 cubic foot of Centaur carbon media .
I figure roughly 300 pounds for a 10x54 tank with water and media. But you are not going to lift it.

You can buy 1/2 inches ID 5/8 OD tubing easily, and fit that into most distributor tubes. I guess you could measure that. But tipping makes sense. If you can brace the base to prevent skidding, maybe you could rig a strap or something to help slow the decent.

I don't know if this is in a basement, or what.

I wonder if there is a practical way to reclaim the course sand.
 

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Got the tank rebedded and the control unit reinstalled. Tipped the tank on it's side and rolled it over to the basement sump crock. Prepared a sieve to catch the old media and sand out of a 12"x 18" deep plastic storage container I drilled some drain holes into the bottom of, and placed down into the crock on top of the pump below the rim, and covered with a bath towel to act as a 'diaper', and propped the bottom end up a 2' long scrap of 6x6 post laid flat on it's side.
 
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