Question on outside GFI outlet

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by James23912, Mar 12, 2021.

  1. James23912

    James23912 Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2020
    Location:
    Vermont
    I am installing an exterior weather resistant GFI outlet, it will rarely be used, but it is right above the panel inside so first in line to other outlets in the house, so I would prefer not to have it shut down the whole circuit, so can I bypass it for the rest of the outlets inside?
    There are holes on the back, actually 2 holes over each screw, 8 total, so I am wondering if this is so I can use only the line side? I was figuring I would need to make a pigtail. Also, the screws are in tight and when I loosened them, they are very short and it does not seem like I could attach the wires to the screws, I don’t use the push in holes normally. Thanks.
    .
     
  2. wwhitney

    wwhitney Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    Yes, if you don't want GFCI protection downstream, you only use the LINE side holes, not the LOAD side holes (which are usually covered by a sticker from the manufacturer.

    Yes, I believe you could put two wires on each LINE side screw for daisy chaining, instead of pigtailing (unless the circuit is half of a MWBC, in which case you must pigtail the neutral).

    As to avoiding push-in holes, the terminals on a GFCI are typically not push-in. They are clamp terminals (may be referred to as side clamp or back clamp). You strip the wire to the specified length per the gauge on the back of the GFCI, loosen the screw, insert the wire, and tighten the screw to the specified torque. The screw clamps two contacts together around the wire. So I consider them better than side wiring with a loop, and they are nothing like the pure push-in spring tension terminals (which are limited to 14 gauge).

    Cheers, Wayne
     
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  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    The inlet to the GFCI needs to go on the line side. If you want to keep the other receptacles without GFCI protection, attach that cable also to the line side. If you want them to be protected, they’d go on the load side. You could do this by using the two line screws, or tie them together with a pigtail that only goes to the GFCI.
     
  5. James23912

    James23912 Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2020
    Location:
    Vermont
    Hi thanks, this weather resistant one is silent from the regular ones, it has no tape strip on the load ie and it appears you the screws. As I said, are real short so it appears, looking more closely, that you have to loosen the screws and then push the wire into the holes and tighten down the screws to hold I in place. I will give it a try later on today, thanks again
     
  6. James23912

    James23912 Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2020
    Location:
    Vermont
    Hi again, I was able to get it the way I want, the weather resistant one is different from the regular ones, no tape on it and you do have to use the push in holes but the side screws then get tightened down to hold them in place. Appreciate the help once again
     
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