Question on moving a toilet

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Scottyb0723

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I apologize in advance as this is probably a stupid question.

I have a WYE with the 45 degree angle facing up that has an extension to a 45 degree elbow that connects to my toilet flange. For informational purposes, the shower and sink drain in behind it, as well as the vent pipe. The piping runs parallel to the floor joists and currently sits on the left side.

I would like to move the toilet closer to the right joist. The amount does not really matter, just want to gain 2-6 inches.

Here is what I am wondering, can I cut the extension pipe out of the WYE and attach a 22.5 degree and 45 degree elbow together (on the remainder of the extension pipe), twisted in such a way that the geometry changes location of the 45 degree elbow, but still sits level properly at the subfloor to connect the new flange? I believe I can accomplish this as I have played around with the connections to make a proper angle, but please correct me if I am wrong. If I a correct about that, my question would be, would this meet code, and more importantly would this cause any plumbing/clogging problems?
 

wwhitney

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BTW, if you roll the wye 45 degrees from vertical, then you would need a 60 degree bend to turn the branch from/to vertical, and this is available as a single fitting.

If you want to use the 45 and the 22.5 in a planar configuration to make a 67.5 degree bend, then you'd roll the wye 57 degrees off vertical. So with a 45 and a 22.5 you can roll the wye anywhere from 0 to 57 degrees and get to vertical by adjusting the angle between the 45 and 22.5.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

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I don't picture what you are describing, but some 45 degree flanges are very good.

In the area of offsets, some are better than others. You can get a decent compression cast iron offset flange that offsets one inch.

Sioux Chief "Push Tite" (offset) flange (889-GPOM or 889-GAOM) has a stainless ring, and will go into a vertical 4 inch pipe or a 4x3 closet bend. Offset = 1.5 inches. An advantage of a compression or a Push Tite flange is that you don't glue them in, so they are not as dependent on getting them right the first time.
 

Scottyb0723

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Nobody likes an offset flange.
Your idea of cutting and using a 22 and 45 to shorten things up is much better.
Thanks,

I ended up using a 45 and 60 to get the desired location of the flange. Attached is a picture. Just wanted to illustrate to see if there were any concerns before sealing up the floor.

Screenshot_20220322-151349_Gallery.jpg
 

Reach4

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Is that hub plumb, or have those top two fittings been not yet glued?

Is there really a 60 in that photo?
 

Scottyb0723

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Is that hub plumb, or have those top two fittings been not yet glued?

Is there really a 60 in that photo?
Hi,
They are glued, the hub has a slight tilt forward away from the wall, but level side to side. I would not expect that to be an issue, but I am no expert.

The 60 is at the top.
 
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Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

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