Pump check valve ?

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RonL1

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As I was installing my new pump, I looked down Into the top and saw this plastic piece that looked like a screwed in protection cap. I reached in and it was loose and it pulled up maybe an inch or 2. It had a raised section like it was made to turn and it did, I then realized it was probably the check valve. Sound about right? As it looked like it would be pushed up when the well kicked on and then fall back when turned off.
But this pump makes a noise when it turns off, I'm assuming it's this valve being pushed back down. The original pump didn't make the noise... not really a water hammer... but maybe a small one. I do have an inline check valve about 2 feet from the pressure tank. But it has to have time to close too. Again just a new noise I havnt heard before. Only when the well turns off.
 

LLigetfa

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I do have an inline check valve about 2 feet from the pressure tank.
An above ground check valve is illegal in many states and a bad idea regardless.

Did you take a picture of what you purport to be a check valve inside the pump? I assume this is a submersible pump. An inline check valve at the top of the pump can be installed as a precaution.
 

RonL1

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Nope no pictures, but my inline valve has been there for probably 25 plus years. Not sure if it's illegal in SC, but makes me wonder why that would be.
 

Reach4

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There is at least one state where it is mandatory, but most of us think that is misguided. But much of the time, there is not a noticeable symptom.

The safety reason to not have a topside check valve, when using a submersible pump, is that it can allow a vacuum to form in the pipe on the way to the well. That vacuum can suck in high ground water, which may be contaminated.

An advantage to such a valve is that if the check valve at the pump fails, the topside check valve prevents the pump from cycling. Such a valve can be put in as a temporary workaround until the submersible pump next gets pulled for a different reason.

The above ground check valve can cause a bang when the pump turns on.

If the only checkvalve(s) are in or at the pump, a tiny leak in the check valve will be compensated for by the pump turning on periodically, so no vacuum develops.
 

RonL1

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I looked online for a picture and this is as close as I can find. Similar, but only one raised section accross the middle that you can grab onto.
SmartSelect_20220731-100525_Chrome.jpg
 

LLigetfa

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my inline valve has been there for probably 25 plus years.
The length of time it's been there increases the risk. If the line from the pump to the tank runs underground, and a leak develops in it, the above ground check valve can cause contaminated surface water to enter the pipe.

The check valve inside the pump is not spring loaded and it relies on the back pressure from the tank for it to seal well. Without that back pressure, gravity pulling down the water column can create suction in the pipe that can then draw in contaminated surface water.

It not being illegal in your state does not make it a good idea. There is sound reason for the law.
 
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RonL1

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Yes, I had a leak many many years ago, and that's when the above ground check valve went in. To stop the cycling until I could replace the cheap pipe. I just never removed it. But you bring up good points why it shouldn't be there. I'll remove it next oportunity.
My main concern of this post was if what I saw was actually the check valve , or something that should have been removed. Plus the slight noise when the well turns off.
 

LLigetfa

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My main concern of this post was if what I saw was actually the check valve , or something that should have been removed.
It is a check valve and no, it should not be removed.

As for the topside check valve, perhaps you can just remove the innards and not have to redo the fittings. That way, if you ever need to put back the innards in an emergency, it will be quick and easy.
 
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