Point of Use Reverse Osmosis

Discussion in 'Water Softener Forum, Questions and Answers' started by Jsmallberries, Jun 30, 2020.

  1. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Now that I'm operational with the softener, I want to add a reverse osmosis under the kitchen sink to improve the drinking water quality for my family.

    Any recommendations? and will it help remove the added sodium ions from the water while removing impurities?

    Since it is municipal water would it be helpful?

    From the published water quality reports, there all kinds of dangerous chemicals and compounds allowed.
     
  2. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Our largest concern with our well sourced municipal water is Arsenic. In addition, our town is surrounded by highly sprayed agriculture crops and when we installed our point-of-use RO unit, there was a CCA wood treatment plant within town, close to one of the municipal wells. That treatment plant now produces treated lumber with chemicals that are supposedly safer, but time may prove otherwise.

    We do not typically consume non RO water. We usually will take a supply of water with us when away from home. On the odd occasion we purchase bottled water, we always attempt to obtain RO if possible.

    The RO membrane will remove sodium and most other elements including minerals and metals. Chemicals such as chlorine or chloramine will be removed by the carbon block filter(s) located prior to the membrane.

    There are plenty of low cost units produced offshore, often made with low quality components. Recommend to obtain brands that utilize North America produced components such as Pentek, Omnipure, John Guest, Aquatec etc.

    While most systems will utilize inexpensive and commonly available 2.5"X 10" filter cartridges, for ease of filter and membrane replacement, you may wish to consider a system equipped with quick change components such as Omnipure Q series filters. Use of a Pentair GRO membrane will reduce the amount of waste water compared to conventional RO membranes, and as the GRO is supplied in a sealed enclosure, the entire enclosure will be simply and quickly replaced as needed (typically 3-5 years).
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
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  4. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

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    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
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    Good to know, thanks.
     
  5. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Occupation:
    Water systems designer, R&D, Technical Director
    Location:
    Ontario California
    PM sent, the vast majority of RO's are off shored to the lowest bidder. A good RO will cost double a pile of garbage. The big names tend to sell theirs for about 10X the cost of a good one without a major name brand behind it. Avoid the online guys as they are typically looking for a new lower priced components or company to make theirs. Especially with the recent tariffs, the price has gone up, so these companies just switched to even lower end components...
     
  6. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Meant "Point of Use" updated heading.

    So recommendations for an under the sink, point of use RO
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  7. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    I don't want to drill a hole through the countertop with a separate water tap, can I simply connect to the cold water to the kitchen sink?
    Any reasons not to?
     
  8. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Do not run RO water through metal.

    How many countertop holes do you have?
     
  9. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Quartz countertop w/one hole for the main faucet.

    1)Since you mentioned not to run RO water through metal, how do you get it into your drinking glass? The marketing I see depicts a separate tap made from metal.

    I've been finding statements like the following;

    "Water obtained from RO filtration process has a low pH value. Prolonged consumption of low pH water has adverse health effects such as increasing the risk of kidney disorders and gastrointestinal troubles.

    2) Does my softened water pose the same problem?

    3) Do I need an RO that adds back minerals like some claim?

    4) So not a good idea to use one?

    What the deal?
     
  10. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Good point. Maybe I should say not to run RO through your copper and galvanized, and there is some stainless that is safe. Or maybe that spigot is largely chrome-plated plastic.

    Bull. I know this term will seem weird, but the alkalinity of RO water is very low. It takes very little to turn it to neutral or akalyine when added to the body. It will not raise the pH of your stomach in a measurable way, even when compared to drinking pH 7 water.

    No.
    It's a matter of taste more than health. You get the magnesium and calcium for your diet through food, and water is a small matter.

    I would not say that. If you have the suspicion of chemicals in your water, I think it would be a great idea.
     
  11. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Occupation:
    Water systems designer, R&D, Technical Director
    Location:
    Ontario California
    Most RO spouts are stainless, underneath you will notice brass, but they are typically plastic sleeved or at minimum they are lead free (usually... many importers use unqualified brass in order to save a few $. The internals of the faucets are all plastics and ceramics.
     
  12. taylorjm

    taylorjm Member

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    Dec 18, 2019
    Location:
    Saginaw, Michigan
    You don't want to run your RO system to your cold water faucet. You would end up doing dishes with RO water, filling pots with RO water, etc and unless you have a big tank you would run out of water in a hurry. Plus you would be lucky to get 0.5gpm from an RO system which is a trickle compared to your current cold water faucet. You need a separate faucet for RO water.
     
  13. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Almost everybody runs only hot water to the dishwasher.

    Filling pots with RO water doesn't seem like a problem, whether it is cooking pots or flower pots.

    I agree, however, that a separate spigot would be better. What if this faucet had one of those flex hose sprays for everything? Not so good for filling a water bottle, I would not think.

    Getting somebody to drill a hole for a combination dispenser faucet and air gap would be a good move. And then you know that the materials are RO-compatible. I wonder if somebody does a 3-way: RO spigot, RO air gap, and dishwasher air gap.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2020 at 6:06 PM
  14. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Thanks for the information. Dishwashers here are high looped, but air gap would be better. Just don't like drilling into a quartz countertop, seems sacrilegious. Back to the drawing board......
     
  15. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
  16. Jsmallberries

    Jsmallberries Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2015
    Location:
    Zephyrhills, Florida
    Thanks again R4, yeah I know, it was just so expensive, but with the correct drill bit, and that photo looks good
     
  17. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    To reduce the potential of chipping the countertop, adhere masking tape on the intended location to mark on and to drill through. Use a smaller drill bit than required to slowly drill from the top to the bottom so you will know exactly where the faucet stem will be located below the counter. Use the final larger size drill bit to slowly drill 1/2 way from below upward, then drill from above downward the other 1/2 distance.
     
  18. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Occupation:
    Water systems designer, R&D, Technical Director
    Location:
    Ontario California
    If all you are wanting to do is drill a granite or other similar material countertop for an RO faucet it is much easier than you would expect. Slow and lots of water and you will be fine. I use plumbers putty to make a donut around where I want my hole. Use a cordless drill with this bit from Lowes and you will have a perfect hole in 5 minutes max. https://www.lowes.com/pd/LENOX-1-2-in-Diamond-Arbored-Hole-Saw/1000683505

    I keep wanting to do a quick video on how to DIY this, but no time. DD.jpg
     
  19. taylorjm

    taylorjm Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2019
    Location:
    Saginaw, Michigan
    I was actually thinking about that occasional pot or pan that you wash by hand and have to put soapy water in the sink and rinsing, not hooking up a dishwasher to RO. I knew what I meant, just didn't word it correctly!
     
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