Plumbing company suggesting different softener, please help me choose!

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Pete4www

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I received a quote 3 weeks ago on a water softener, and set the install date which is coming up next week. I was quoted a 32,000k metered softener made by Pacific Water Inc. which I am told has a Clack valve, I think it's also called a Sentry II system. Yesterday, the plumber texted me and said he could get me this different water softener called Novo 489HE series NVO489DF-100. Which after much digging on the internet, is manufacturered by Canature Watergroup. There is almost NO information or reviews about softeners made by Canature, and I understand they are a newer entry into the US. I have a gut feeling, and that is all I have, is a gut feeling not to trust this "Novo" system, and to go instead with the softener I was originally quoted for. I am worried about the after sale, maintenance, reliability, parts availability. Am I safer going with the Pacific Water system with the clack valve? I have to make a decision withing the next coming days. And if there's something you're not allowed to say in the forum, please PM me! Thanks so much for anyone that can provide input on this matter, I truly appreciate it.
 

Bannerman

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Review of this forum will indicate the two most recommended control valve brands are Fleck and Clack. For various reasons, there are numerous threads which advise against other brands.

I have no experience or knowledge of the dealer you mention so I can't provide an opinion good or bad. I have visited the PW website but found it to be a waste of time as no information is shown.

A 32K grain capacity system would normally indicate the system will contain 1 cubic foot (1 ft3) of softening resin, usually contained within a 9" diameter X 48" tall tank.

You didn't specify if your water is sourced from a private well or a municipal supply, and you also didn't indicator monthly water consumption or the hardness quantity in the incoming raw water as tested at your location.

A softener equipped with 1.5 ft3 resin (48,000 grains total capacity) is the minimum usually recommended, but if your water is sourced from a private well which contains iron/manganese, then a smaller softener will be often utilized so as to regenerate more frequently to assist to reduce iron/manganese accumulation (fouling) on the resin surface.
 

Pete4www

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Review of this forum will indicate the two most recommended control valve brands are Fleck and Clack. For various reasons, there are numerous threads which advise against other brands.

I have no experience or knowledge of the dealer you mention so I can't provide an opinion good or bad. I have visited the PW website but found it to be a waste of time as no information is shown.

A 32K grain capacity system would normally indicate the system will contain 1 cubic foot (1 ft3) of softening resin, usually contained within a 9" diameter X 48" tall tank.

You didn't specify if your water is sourced from a private well or a municipal supply, and you also didn't indicator monthly water consumption or the hardness quantity in the incoming raw water as tested at your location.

A softener equipped with 1.5 ft3 resin (48,000 grains total capacity) is the minimum usually recommended, but if your water is sourced from a private well which contains iron/manganese, then a smaller softener will be often utilized so as to regenerate more frequently to assist to reduce iron/manganese accumulation (fouling) on the resin surface.
Sorry that is the link to the softener, their website is weird to view their softeners you have to click on Parts-> Softeners. I am on municipal water in St. George, Utah, not sure the exact gpg here but we are notorious for our hard water. Just 2 people living in our house including myself.
 

Bannerman

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Municipal water will be chlorinated so iron/manganese will not be a concern. With no iron present, the usual recommendation is to obtain a large enough system so regeneration will occur somewhere between 1X per week and 1X per month. While there are currently 2 residents, is there any possibility that occupancy will expand beyond 2 people in the foreseeable future?

To achieve the best balance of usable capacity, water quality, and salt efficiency, a softener containing 1 ft3 resin will be typically programmed to regenerate once 24,000 grains capacity has been consumed as only 8 lbs salt will be needed to regenerate that amount of depleted capacity,

If for example, your municipal water contains 24 grains per gallon hardness, then regeneration will need to occur after every 1,000 gallons of soft water usage. Anticipating a daily average of 60 gallons per person, then regeneration frequency is likely to be every 7-8 days.

Using the same estimates for a 1.5 ft3 system which is programmed to regenerate after 36,000 grains consumption using 12 lbs salt, the regeneration frequency is estimated to be 11-12 days. This size system will allow 3 persons without requiring more than 1 regeneration per week.

A 2 ft3 system which is programmed to regenerate when 48,000 grains have been depleted, will require 16 lbs salt. The regeneration frequency is then estimated to be 15-16 days. This size system will provide for 2 people while well within the 1 regeneration per month rule, but will allow for 4 persons without requiring more than 1 regeneration per week.

Since your water will be chlorinated, unless you are also considering installing a carbon backwashing filter to remove the chlorine before the softener, then it will be advisable to upgrade the softener to include 10% cross-linked resin as 10% will better tolerate constant chlorine exposure compared to Standard 8% cross-link resin.
 

Pete4www

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Municipal water will be chlorinated so iron/manganese will not be a concern. With no iron present, the usual recommendation is to obtain a large enough system so regeneration will occur somewhere between 1X per week and 1X per month. While there are currently 2 residents, is there any possibility that occupancy will expand beyond 2 people in the foreseeable future?

To achieve the best balance of usable capacity, water quality, and salt efficiency, a softener containing 1 ft3 resin will be typically programmed to regenerate once 24,000 grains capacity has been consumed as only 8 lbs salt will be needed to regenerate that amount of depleted capacity,

If for example, your municipal water contains 24 grains per gallon hardness, then regeneration will need to occur after every 1,000 gallons of soft water usage. Anticipating a daily average of 60 gallons per person, then regeneration frequency is likely to be every 7-8 days.

Using the same estimates for a 1.5 ft3 system which is programmed to regenerate after 36,000 grains consumption using 12 lbs salt, the regeneration frequency is estimated to be 11-12 days. This size system will allow 3 persons without requiring more than 1 regeneration per week.

A 2 ft3 system which is programmed to regenerate when 48,000 grains have been depleted, will require 16 lbs salt. The regeneration frequency is then estimated to be 15-16 days. This size system will provide for 2 people while well within the 1 regeneration per month rule, but will allow for 4 persons without requiring more than 1 regeneration per week.

Since your water will be chlorinated, unless you are also considering installing a carbon backwashing filter to remove the chlorine before the softener, then it will be advisable to upgrade the softener to include 10% cross-linked resin as 10% will better tolerate constant chlorine exposure compared to Standard 8% cross-link resin.
No it's just me and my sister that live in the house, neither of us have kids. If she got in a relationship she would move out leaving just me there. I am divorced and don't plan on getting in a relationship anytime soon. So there will never be more than 2 people in our 3 bed, 2 bath home. We do about 4 loads of laundry a week between the two of us, shower daily, run the dishwasher maybe once a week, we never fill up bathtubs. I looked up the water hardness here and a few websites says it's 20 grains per gallon here.
 

Bannerman

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Recommend ensuring the hardness level is determined directly at your home.

Municipal systems are typically supplied by more than 1 water source and each will often have a different level of hardness. The town will often state the 'average' hardness of all sources combined, but your home may be located closer to a source that has greater hardness than average.

Since a hardness test is only a snapshot and because hardness can vary depending on daily water consumption patterns throughout the town, distribution system maintenance etc, it is generally advisable to program your softener for 2-3 gpg higher than the hardness test result to anticipate occasions when hardness will be higher and resin capacity will be consumed more rapidly than anticipated.
 
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