Plumbing and Framing (non load-bearing wall)

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by jb9, Oct 26, 2016.

  1. jb9

    jb9 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Location:
    California
    Hello,

    I have a general question about the best practices in new construction. More specifically, I am trying to get my design refined and now I am drawing in the framing on the non load-bearing wall that will enclose the mechanical. Is it OK to move the studs around for optimal placement with regards to the DWV as long as I have studs aligned at 4' for clean drywall seams? I know the GC might prefer things to be clean and 16" OC but I will definitely have studs at least every 24". In a non load-bearing wall, is it OK to optimize things for you guys (the plumber)? I am attaching a drawing I just made and would like to hear what the general consensus is (if there is one). Also, I know that I still need to address supply to the fixtures but my thinking is that there is more flexibility there.

    Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. lanachurner

    lanachurner Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2016
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I can follow your picture better than your writing.
    No it's not a big deal to have your framing less than 16"oc. It is something of a big deal to have it More than 16" oc. Sometimes I will cheat an inch or two but no more than that.
    As long as you maintain your 48" spacing for the sheetrock. How long is that wall?
    If it's less than 8' your drywaller can hang the sheets horizontally. Then the stud spacing isn't critical as he can see where the studs are as he hangs it.
    Don't forget to add blocking for any grab bars, pedistal sinks or even towel bars, robe hooks, tp holders, shelves and the like. For grab bars and sinks blocking is imperative. For the rest of the accoutrements it's great to install them into wood and not just the drywall.
     
  3. Sponsor

    Sponsor Paid Advertisement

     
  4. hj

    hj Master Plumber

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; It is something of a big deal to have it More than 16" oc.

    24" o.c. is not uncommon, especially with 2x6 studs.
    Put the drywall horizontal and it does make much difference what the spacing is as long as they are plumb.
     
  5. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Occupation:
    Test, Don't Guess!
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Drywall is normally hung on the horizontal, so 4' is not the concern. with one full and one partial sheet end to end, consideration needs to be made for securing the ends of the sheets properly. Plumbers are used to doing the job after all the framing is already in place, so you need not overthink it. More often than not the piping will not be installed exactly the way you might think anyway. 5 different plumbers will probably do it 5 different ways, none of them necessarily wrong.
     
  6. lanachurner

    lanachurner Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2016
    Location:
    Minnesota

    About the only place you see 24"oc in residential framing is in ceilings where the trusses or ceiling joists are spaced that wide. But there you would use 5/8" rock. For residential walls where 1/2" rock is used the norm is 16" oc.
     
  7. lanachurner

    lanachurner Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2016
    Location:
    Minnesota
    This is not quite true.
    Drywall can be hung both ways.
    It's really all about avoiding butt/end joints in your rock as they are much harder to tape.
     
  8. MKS

    MKS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2016
    Location:
    Illinois
    I just assisted in a similar situation. 2x6 partition wall with three pvc dwv lines coming up from slab floor. Studs were installed off typical layout to accommodate the plumbing lines,
    Drywall is available in up to 16 foot lengths.
    Adjustment to floor truss layout to accommodate HVAC trunk was also done here.
     
  9. bluebinky

    bluebinky Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Occupation:
    Electrical/Embedded Software Engineer, Retired
    Location:
    Des Moines, WA
    I've seen hundreds of houses built with walls spaced at 24" using 2x6 studs and 1/2" drywall in Texas.
     
  10. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Occupation:
    Test, Don't Guess!
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Perhaps, but why would anyone do that on a non-load bearing interior wall?
     
  11. bluebinky

    bluebinky Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Occupation:
    Electrical/Embedded Software Engineer, Retired
    Location:
    Des Moines, WA
    Just making the point that 1/2 inch sheet rock will be OK at an occasional more than 16" stud spacing.
     
  12. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Occupation:
    Test, Don't Guess!
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    If it were in an area not subject to being banged into, maybe it would be ok. I would definitely use some blocking/bracing to tie adjacent studs together to better support the sheetrock if it were anything but.
     
  13. jb9

    jb9 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Location:
    California
    These are all really helpful suggestions. The wall is only about 10 feet long. Based on what I have learned, I am going to try and keep them at least 16" and no longer than 20". I will use blocking/bracing too. My goal is to optimize the location of the studs for the plumbing infrastructure even if it means a little extra (pain in the rear) for the sheetrock. I have also heard it's possible to turn a stud sideways for longer horizontal pipe runs. My service cavity is going to be 7" deep so hopefully between a well developed DWV and some foresight, I can have a nice finished stiff wall.
     
Similar Threads: Plumbing Framing
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Plumbing vs Framing Sep 21, 2016
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Best framing solution for rough plumbing Nov 11, 2007
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice framing for plumbing Oct 16, 2007
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Plumbing layout. Need validation please Yesterday at 12:10 PM
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Plumbing Issue Under Old Mobile Home Sunday at 1:09 PM

Share This Page