P-Trap, can I put this in like this?

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Pitterpat

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Trying to finish up the bathroom remodel. I need to put in the P-trap from my shower pan. I have access to the plumbing from the basement (open ceiling). I've got 2 questions:

1. I'm wondering if I can do the P-trap like in the photo's I've attached. In the 3rd photo of course the P-trap won't hang down at that angle but will be at least 1/4" per ft. slope to where it will connect to the drain line.

The reason for the 90 deg. Fernco instead of a long sweep or regular sweep 90 is because the long sweep won't fit. With the regular sweep 90 when you attach the p-trap the top fitting that comes out of the p-trap hits the bottom of the joist ( not enough room to run 2" line to the drain.

The p-trap is connected back to the drain of the shower pan with a Fernco (yellow) supplied by the pan manufacturer (Schluter), I put in a linear drain in the shower pan.


I then have a 90 deg Fernco ( blue) with a 22 deg fitting (blue) attached to it.


Then here is the p-trap. Of course it will be sloped appropriately.


2. Where is the best place to install 3" Fernco, green area or red area. I'm thinking the green area. I need to add a 3" Fernco to this line because I need to "turn down" the wye to attach the drain from the shower pan. I didn't install it like this, the plumber I used installed it like this with the wye facing the ceiling. I know I should have him come back but don't want to hassle with it and want to get done.
 
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hj

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NO inspector would approve that "rubber" 90, and where is the shower vent before you connect to the main line? What "you" call a Fernco is probably NOT allowed inside the building.
 

Jadnashua

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Banded couplings are required above ground...the fitting supplied would be okay if it was buried, say with a shower built on slab. It looks like you ended up with the linear drain sitting partially above the basement foundation wall...tough place to deal with.

No flexible connections allowed!

The vent must be attached before the drain line can turn down after the trap, and within 5' of the trap.
 

Pitterpat

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Banded couplings are required above ground...the fitting supplied would be okay if it was buried, say with a shower built on slab. It looks like you ended up with the linear drain sitting partially above the basement foundation wall...tough place to deal with.

No flexible connections allowed!

The vent must be attached before the drain line can turn down after the trap, and within 5' of the trap.
The first sentence and the sentence about flexible connections don't make sense.

The vent is back toward the left side of the pic, past the 3" drain line I need to cut to rotate the wye.
 

hj

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From what I see, a vent at that location would be useless and a "Fernco", meaning a rubber sleeve with two hose clamps is NOT permitted anywhere inside a building. That "elbow" looks like a Fernco flexible rubber one.
 

Jadnashua

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Fernco makes LOTS of products, one of them, the one with a thick rubber sleeve with hose clamps on each end has colloquially become called a Fernco, but, as said, that Fernco product cannot be properly used above ground as the two ends of the pipe can become misaligned...they work underground where they are supported by proper backfill. The banded coupling also uses a rubber sleeve (much thinner) but it has a full metal jacket around it to keep the two pieces correctly aligned and those are designed to be used above ground. So, it makes perfect sense, if you understand!

Calling all Fernco products the one with rubber sleeve and only hose clamps is like calling all Kleenex products a Kleenex, where they make all sorts of things. One of these IS code for use in this situation, and, as you can see, is also a Fernco product:
sc-proflex-main.jpg


http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/shielded-couplings/proflex-couplings
 

Pitterpat

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Banded couplings are required above ground...the fitting supplied would be okay if it was buried, say with a shower built on slab. It looks like you ended up with the linear drain sitting partially above the basement foundation wall...tough place to deal with.

No flexible connections allowed!

The vent must be attached before the drain line can turn down after the trap, and within 5' of the trap.
Fernco makes LOTS of products, one of them, the one with a thick rubber sleeve with hose clamps on each end has colloquially become called a Fernco, but, as said, that Fernco product cannot be properly used above ground as the two ends of the pipe can become misaligned...they work underground where they are supported by proper backfill. The banded coupling also uses a rubber sleeve (much thinner) but it has a full metal jacket around it to keep the two pieces correctly aligned and those are designed to be used above ground. So, it makes perfect sense, if you understand!

Calling all Fernco products the one with rubber sleeve and only hose clamps is like calling all Kleenex products a Kleenex, where they make all sorts of things. One of these IS code for use in this situation, and, as you can see, is also a Fernco product: View attachment 34445

http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/shielded-couplings/proflex-couplings
So are you saying the 90 or the coupling or both need to be shielded?
 

Jadnashua

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So are you saying the 90 or the coupling or both need to be shielded?
IN a drainage pipe, you cannot use those flexible, all-rubber fittings above ground. Stores sell whatever they want, that does not mean that they should be used. Just like you can buy an old-style two handle shower valve...can't use it unless you add in the required anti-scald bits to make it compliant. They don't likely tell you that on the package, either.
 

CountryBumkin

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If you were ever needing to "snake" the shower drain, I think the "flexible rubber" part would be susceptible to tearing/failing.
Can you cut/chip away some of the top edge of that concrete block to allow the use of all ridged PVC?
 

Pitterpat

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If you were ever needing to "snake" the shower drain, I think the "flexible rubber" part would be susceptible to tearing/failing.
Can you cut/chip away some of the top edge of that concrete block to allow the use of all ridged PVC?
I hadn't thought of doing that, I'll take a look after the race.
 

Pitterpat

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Ok, how about if I do this, no use of Fernco and using pvc? And yes, to be really comfortable with it I will have have to notch the joist. I know the max depth I can notch this 2 x 8 is 1 1/4" and I'll have to turn the 90 about 45 deg or so so I can get the notch within the first 1/3 of the end of the joist (the joist span is 14' 6") from this site: https://engineering.purdue.edu/~jliu/courses/CE479/extras/Notching_&_Boring_Guide_A11.pdf

Here I've extended the horizontal 2" pipe.


Next is where the p-trap is:


And the pipe that is in the way, the venting from my furnace to the outside.
 
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Terry

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Is it possible to relocate the furnace piping?
It looks like you could move the furnace venting below all of that.
 
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Widgit Maker

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Suggestion

Since this is a shower and this trap will remain exposed, you may want to use a trap with a clean out. Make removing hair that gets caught in the trap easier.


new setup 3 pipe in the way-1.jpg
 
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Pitterpat

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Suggestion

Since this is a shower and this trap will remain exposed, you may want to use a trap with a clean out. Make removing hair that gets caught in the trap easier.


View attachment 34449
It is the joist that is in the way, the bottom of the vent pipe from the furnace is actually about 1" above the bottom of the joist.



I almost spoke too soon. I just went down and mocked up what you said to do in the picture; looks like that may work. I'll do it tomorrow and let you know how it turns out.

I still have the matter of cutting the 3" drain line to turn the wye down to be able to attach the 2" drain line.
 
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Widgit Maker

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If the vent pipe is above the bottom edge of the joist, put a street 45 where indicated, put a long street 90 in the 45 to go horizontal and put on your trap flat against the wall. Turn the elbow out of the trap to point to the drain. You will probably want the drain pipe tight up against the joist at this end to get the grade to the Y.
Don't see where it makes much difference where you cut the 3" drain line if all you want to do is rotate the Y and put in a coupling.

Where is the vent for the shower going to be?
 

MKS

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Wet vent question, lots of ifs.
If 3/4 bath, shower, toilet and lav.
If lav has a 2" vent through the roof with no other fixture draining into it.
If the the lav drain in 2" goes down through the floor turns on the horizontal meets up with the shower drain after the p-trap then connects to the three inch drain via the wye that is pointing toward the floor.
Would that be an appropriate wet vent for this group?
Im assuming moving the furnace vent and running the drain through the joists.
 

Pitterpat

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Wet vent question, lots of ifs.
If 3/4 bath, shower, toilet and lav.
If lav has a 2" vent through the roof with no other fixture draining into it.
If the the lav drain in 2" goes down through the floor turns on the horizontal meets up with the shower drain after the p-trap then connects to the three inch drain via the wye that is pointing toward the floor.
Would that be an appropriate wet vent for this group?
Im assuming moving the furnace vent and running the drain through the joists.

Have no idea what you're talking about. Can't run drain through the joists, joist are 2 x 8, joists aren't big enough to drill a 2" at least hole through them.
And as written before, THE FURNACE VENT CAN'T BE MOVED!
 
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