New install - sanity check

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Hilld

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Hi, I am an avid reader, but first time poster (just registered). I am building a shop with an apartment and finding a plumber is tough on an island, unless I want to wait 3 months or longer. In any case, the under slab rough in was done by a plumber before the concrete was poured, consists of a 3" stub for the toilet in the shop, vented by a 2" stack and a main 3" stack.

I have built several homes before and am not new to this, but before I go to down so to speak, here is my diagram as I envision it. I have already added another vent as shown in some diagrams/photos by @Terry

The one part that I am not 100% sure if I can use the 2" stack as a drain for the washing machine and the bathroom sink directly above on the second floor (they share a wall). The shower and toilet are at the opposite end of the bathroom. I will also feed the kitchen sink and DW into the 3" stack.

Here is my sketch.
 

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wwhitney

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The one part that I am not 100% sure if I can use the 2" stack as a drain for the washing machine and the bathroom sink directly above on the second floor (they share a wall).
Definitely no.

You can do something like the drawing below, where Purple means dry vent (nothing drains into it). This wet vents the upper WC/shower from the upper lav. If you don't want to run the lav drain over to the other side, you could instead dry vent the shower and use that to wet vent the WC (or, I guess in WA, vice versa, as you originally drew). Also, the way the WC and shower/lav join the stack isn't precisely shown in your drawing, that can be slightly tricky if they are approaching the stack from opposite sides.

Cheers, Wayne

IMG_3152 (1).JPG
 

Hilld

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Thank you much appreciated. So I don't need to have a vent near the upstairs toilet using a Wye?
 

wwhitney

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The upstairs WC can be dry vented or wet vented. The downstairs layout shown is an example of wet venting a WC via a lav, the lav vent and drain need to be 2". You can also have the shower on the same horizontal wet vent, allowing it to be wet vented via the lav as well. But that horizontal wet vent is restricted to bathroom fixtures, so the way you've drawn the separately vented kitchen sink (and now laundry in my drawing) joining the upstairs bathroom downstream of all the bathroom fixtures is a requirement.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

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P.S. The above drawing is OK for the vertical layout and what can connect to what. For further detail on the layout of the washer and the upstairs bathroom, a floor plan would be required.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Terry

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Each floor gets it's own venting. A vent from downstairs ties into the floor above six inches above the highest fixture flood level. That is so that no water or waste goes down a vent line.

Waste from the upper floors will tie in below the plumbing fixtures below.
Be careful how you tie in the toilet and what fitting you use. Make sure that blast from a flush is forced downward and not allowed to skip over a fitting.

dwv_b2.jpg
 
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Hey, wait a minute.

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