My alcove tub is 1 inch too short; what do I do?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by JanSolo, Aug 8, 2020.

  1. JanSolo

    JanSolo New Member

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    Aug 2, 2020
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    professional bodger
    Location:
    Laval, QC
    Hello again, wise plumbing elders!

    My tub arrived and I offered it up to the space in my bathroom.
    At a glance, it looks fine!
    D57EF888-1D13-4838-8BB9-947EF1EF12D9.jpeg

    However, there's a problem. The tub is 60 inches and the space is 61 inches.
    754B3E2C-867B-41FD-B70A-10F8B622541D.jpeg

    The tub has a skirt that you're supposed to attach to the wall, align with the drywall and then tile over... How am I supposed to bridge that gap and still be able to drywall my room?

    Help me, O wise plumbers!

    Cheers

    Jan.
     
  2. James Henry

    James Henry In the Trades

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    I would just fur that whole wall out.
     
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  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Plumber
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    I agree. Add more wood to the back wall to bring it in further and problem solved.
     
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  5. Terry H

    Terry H In the Trades

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    Alabama
    This x 3. Scab studs on the side and just bring them out to where they touch the tub and then nail or screw them to the studs. Easiest way to do it for me
     
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  6. JanSolo

    JanSolo New Member

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    professional bodger
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    Laval, QC
    Thanks for answering, chaps!

    So I need to buy a bunch of 1 inch strips and attach them to all the existing studs on that wall, yes?
    Both horizontal AND vertical, correct?

    I need to check that my door will still open too...
     
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    You only need it near the tub.
     
  8. wwhitney

    wwhitney Active Member

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    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    Depending on the room layout it may be easier to do the whole wall or to just do the area that will get tile. The latter option will require dealing with a 1" offset in the wall finish between the tile and the drywall. That could be done with a quarter round tile but it adds some complexity.

    So if the whole wall is blank, and you won't miss the 1", furring out the whole wall would be simplest. If the wall has a door or window, then dealing with the trim would be trouble, in which case furring out just behind the tile may be simplest.

    Cheers, Wayne
     
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  9. Terry H

    Terry H In the Trades

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    Location:
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    You can do that or use 2x4 to attach to the sides of the old 2x4 studs and that will allow you to move the wall out at far as you need.

    That will allow you some movement because most 1x4 etc are not true one inch thick. 5/4 decking boards are true one inch. I would do the 2x4s they are only 2.50$ each and move the wall where you want it. Put studs in the wall and pull out until the are flush with the tub and level to the top, then screw or nail off.

    hopefully I’m making sense.
     
  10. JanSolo

    JanSolo New Member

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    professional bodger
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    Is it better to put strips over the studs or to attach new studs to the sides of the existing ones like this:
    420B2451-CC7D-496F-8B08-CA196FC66C3A.jpeg
     
  11. Terry H

    Terry H In the Trades

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    That picture is exactly how I do it.
     
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  12. wwhitney

    wwhitney Active Member

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    Location:
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    Depends. If the existing studs are all in plane with each other, and proper thickness furring material is readily available, then furring is quicker. If the studs are all over the place, and you can get new straight studs, sistering is quicker. Either way use kiln dried material.

    Cheers, Wayne
     
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  13. JanSolo

    JanSolo New Member

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    professional bodger
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    Laval, QC
    Hello again, wise plumbing masters! Here's an update on my bathroom project!

    As mentioned above, my bathroom was 1 inch too wide for my bath. Everybody suggested widening the wall by 1 inch using furring strips or sistered studs.

    Well that's what I did.

    I made a little 'guide' with a 1 x 1 notch accurately cut in.
    36AAD54E-E6B8-481D-A5F0-A99927335624.jpeg

    I lined up my sisters with using the guide and screwed em in with 2.5inch construction screws x3 from both sides.
    8E677CC3-CB3E-4C3B-9DB2-6A475B46A00A.jpeg

    Here are my results:
    959F2F9D-E7B0-4DB5-B10A-58628AA81BE0.jpeg
    4E066183-4231-489E-9174-CC7E89769745.jpeg



    Questions:

    Do I need to have wood right into the corners? Will it support the drywall correctly without it? 898BBE49-FDA0-4042-AB41-D4BDD63CB138.jpeg


    I've done all the vertical studs... Do I need the horizontal ones too? The horizontal stud doesn't line up with the width of a sheet of drywall anyway, so if I use two sheets, only one will be screwed into the horizontal... so does that matter if neither of them are screwed in to horizontal studs?
    20AF8DDA-7CD8-4011-B5DD-186889007B6B.jpeg
    959F2F9D-E7B0-4DB5-B10A-58628AA81BE0.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2020
  14. Ryan Symons

    Ryan Symons Dihydrogen monoxide specialist

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    Location:
    Ohio
    I own a tub stretcher for such situations. I can't believe it wasn't suggested!
     
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  15. JanSolo

    JanSolo New Member

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    Aug 2, 2020
    Occupation:
    professional bodger
    Location:
    Laval, QC
    My tub-stretcher was in the shop for an upgrade; I’m having a new toilet-squeezer fitted. If it fits, I sits!
     
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  16. Terry H

    Terry H In the Trades

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    Good job
     
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  17. gagecalman

    gagecalman Member

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    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    I would pad the entire wall. You want the drywall in the corners tight or you will get cracks.
     
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  18. Terry H

    Terry H In the Trades

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    Location:
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    Definitely need wood in the corners and the horizontal bracing was used on older homes to keep the studs from twisting. Most framers don’t use it anymore and since yours are screwed off I wouldn’t worry about that part of it.
     
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