Main water service copper line through concrete wall

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Kiton

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Last year I had my galvanized steel water supply lines changed for copper.

I just read in another thread about how copper should not touch the concrete wall.

I had complained about this at the time the job was being done but the plumber insisted all was fine.
He drilled a hole through the wall and forced the 1" copper through the hole which was just a fraction larger than the pipe. He did not chalk or seal the hole at all before he told the guy to backfill the pit, so I injected foam to keep water from entering.

I recently had the same company in for another job, on the condition they do not send that plumber and they told me he was no longer employed with them.

Should I be asking the company to revisit this and correct the direct contact between the copper and concrete?
 

Kiton

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Thanks Wayne,

Now to formulate the letter to the company, at least it is a really big plumbing house (maybe 20 trucks on the road), not a solo plumber, so easier to absorb the hit of re-doing bad work. He also soldered the reducer from 1 inch to 3/4 and then the uponor fitting so close to the valve, there is zero room for a future repair, the water would need to be shut at the curb and it all cut out if for any reason there was a leak etc.
 

wwhitney

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Not sure what your plumbing code says in Quebec, but the IPC here (used by many but not all states) says:

https://up.codes/viewer/colorado/ipc-2018/chapter/3/general-regulations#305.1

"305.1 Protection Against Contact

Metallic piping, except for cast iron, ductile iron and galvanized steel, shall not be placed in direct contact with steel framing members, concrete or cinder walls and floors or other masonry. Metallic piping shall not be placed in direct contact with corrosive soil. Where sheathing is used to prevent direct contact, the sheathing shall have a thickness of not less than 0.008 inch (8 mil) (0.203 mm) and the sheathing shall be made of plastic. Where sheathing protects piping that penetrates concrete or masonry walls or floors, the sheathing shall be installed in a manner that allows movement of the piping within the sheathing."

Cheers,
Wayne
 

Kiton

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Thank you very much Wayne,

The plumbing and electrical code is written by the National Research Council, then tweaked for some provinces.
I just ordered a copy, it is only $50.00
 

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Jeff H Young

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Even electrical tape would of been better then nothing

Thats horrible I agree electrical tape or 10 mil visqueen, foam wrap . But Important too I belive is dont leave copper in Dirt or sand . We used to put soft copper under houses on slab here (no basement) all the piping hot and cold We would just put poly sleeve where exposed to concrete . then in the 90s we started full sleeving under slab. But by late 90s local builders told us no under slab lines except Island sinks
Many of our local citys require a soil report as to corrosivenes of soil if copper going under house other wise a sleeve approoved required
 

Kiton

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I really appreciate the feed back guys,
I had seen other contractors wrap the pipe, he swore up and down, there was no need.

This is the new pipe, you can see the old lines, where I was told was where the new ones would also go, but he abandon the old lines in place and made a new hole at a 45 degree angle where the wall met the floor. We have a 4 foot frost line, so he just just makes it by going down at that angle.

The galvanized pipes were 70 years old, I would hope this new line out lasts me at least.

What material is best practice for wrapping the pipe?
 

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Terry H

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Like I said I like to sleebe with pvc for various reasons, mainly insulating with spray foam and the durability.

The other option I use a lot is yellow gas tape.
 

Kiton

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poly sleeve it comes in rolls slip it over full length of pipe. google poly sleeve for copper pipe


Thank you Jeff,
I found some online, it is 20 cents a foot here, doesn't make sense to make such a short cut.
I have ordered a roll and will have it on hand when the job is done just to be sure!
 

Jeff H Young

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Thank you Jeff,
I found some online, it is 20 cents a foot here, doesn't make sense to make such a short cut.
I have ordered a roll and will have it on hand when the job is done just to be sure!

Good ! its a good choice not to place bare copper underground
 

Sylvan

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Has anyone mentioned why type of copper was used under ground?

NYC for example requires the water mains to be Red Brass ( no one uses it) or type K under ground and type L above ground and NO we cannot allow the cement to come into contact with any pipe other then cast iron

The piping must be protected by an arch lintel or IPS Sleeve and sealed on both ends to keep critters and water from seeping in
 

Jeff H Young

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Has anyone mentioned why type of copper was used under ground?

NYC for example requires the water mains to be Red Brass ( no one uses it) or type K under ground and type L above ground and NO we cannot allow the cement to come into contact with any pipe other then cast iron

The piping must be protected by an arch lintel or IPS Sleeve and sealed on both ends to keep critters and water from seeping in

Sounds like NYC has high standards and good for them!. I only see type K on high dollar public work or rarely speced out due to soil. We do use type L and nothing less
 

Kiton

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The copper they used was type K, which is code here.

The owner of the plumbing house called and said he will not fix the job, it is fine, in his 30 years of plumbing, most jobs are done like this, he claims it is code compliant and said the best he would do is come back and inject the space with Vaseline. Which I don't accept.
 

Terry H

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The copper they used was type K, which is code here.

The owner of the plumbing house called and said he will not fix the job, it is fine, in his 30 years of plumbing, most jobs are done like this, he claims it is code compliant and said the best he would do is come back and inject the space with Vaseline. Which I don't accept.

I see it all the time but if he knows anything he should know it can put a hole. It doesn’t do it every time but it does do it. A lot of people only sleeve copper gas pipe that goes through concrete because of the hazard although more and more are getting on board.

Unfortunately this is why plumbers are looked down on. Many are perfectly fine being mediocre.
 
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