Is the low heel inlet 1/4 bend allowed to be used on a toilet with inlet vertical as a dry vent?

  • Yes

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  • No

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suceress

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Hi, my state is under IPC 2012.

Via google I found some threads that discussed the use of the low heel inlet bends but there seemed to be some dispute about whether or not they could be used for water closets due to some wording in the code. I think https://up.codes/s/connections-between-drainage-piping-and-fittings was one of the references.

Someone mentioned that under 2012 there was a notation on inlet bend usage
IPC Table 706.3 Notation f.:
"The heel inlet connection of a quarter bend may be used as a wet or dry vent if the heel inlet connection of the quarter bend is located in the vertical position. The heel or side inlet connection may be used as a wet vent if the quarter bend is located directly below a water closet or other fixture with one integral trap."

But there is
706.4 Heel- or side-inlet quarter bends. Heel-inlet quarter bends shall be an acceptable means of connection, except where the quarter bend serves a water closet. A low-heel inlet shall not be used as a wet-vented connection. Side-inlet quarter bends shall be an acceptable means of connection for drainage, wet venting and stack venting arrangements.

Now, is this interpreted as saying that type of fitting can not be used at all with a toilet? Or is it interpreted that the low heel inlet bend can not be used unless in a specific orientation?

Hammerpedia had this drawing saying it was to code:
toiletplumbingidea.png


I think I saw Terry saying to someone that it is OK to use the bend with the inlet vertical as a dry vent. It was a very old thread though so I want to have the most up-to-date and accurate information.

I want to install a toilet against an exterior wall so I will need a run of vertical pipe between the closet flange and the closet bend (to get the pipe to clear the wooden support beams), but it's basically the same configuration. I have to run it so it goes out from under the house and the vent pipe will route around the eaves and above the roof rather than risk putting holes in the metal roof. There is a large beam on the perimeter of the house that can't be drilled through to allow the pipe to pass up inside the wall.

But the main issue is whether or not I can use the low heel inlet quarter bend as pictured.

Yes or No?
 

wwhitney

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Definitely yes. I think you have to read IPC 706.4 with the word "inlet" meaning "drainage inlet". It's fine to use the "inlet" as a vent connection as shown.

But if you are worried, just use a san-tee with a bushing in the top. It's exactly the same. A low heel inlet quarter bend is a san-tee, just a slightly different shape when the side and bottom connections are both larger than the top.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Sylvan

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I used a heel tee on several locations and none of the inspectors saw a problem using it as a vent
 

John Gayewski

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I think this is a good use of that fitting. I would call it legal. Wet vent no, but dry vent yes.
 

suceress

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Thanks! I could not see any reason why it would not work with the inlet as a vent/outlet of sorts. I do intend to tie in a branch vent higher up (but I will not have any drains going in to it).
 

suceress

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To clarify: It's a single story home built up on blocks with a sort of dirt crawlspace underneath. All wood-- only brick is at the fireplace. Concrete pyramid blocks that the supports sit on. The vent I was thinking of tying in is for the lavatory next to the toilet. I don't have a lot of clearance under there in some spots.
 
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