Island loop vent failed inspection

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Rusty Williams

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Looking for some help in understanding what I've done wrong and why this loop vent doesn't work.
The vent side slopes towards the loop, the drain slopes away. A p-trap is above the floor on the drain side, and the vent side connects to the drain side as high as possible under a counter top.
Ohio, IPC.
 

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wwhitney

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Here's the relevant rules:

https://up.codes/viewer/ohio/ipc-2015/chapter/9/vents#916.3

Your inspector should tell you what part of that he is citing. Did you comply with the part that says "Cleanouts shall be provided in the island fixture vent to permit rodding of all vent piping located below the flood level rim of the fixtures."?

I think the way you have the wye labeled "Relief Drain" oriented arguably violates the first sentence of 916.3, which says to install the vent piping below the flood rim as a drainage pattern. If water is draining in the direction of the red arrows in your picture, it enounters a sharp 135 degree bend on the wye, not something allowed for a drain.

If you need to fix that, it might be hard to get everything to line up, but you could replace the wye with a straight section, the elbow labeled "vent" with a san-tee, and the come out of the bottom of the san-tee with a street 45 to try to hit lower wye in the drain.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rusty Williams

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Thanks wwhitney, your second point cleared it up for me. I was only focused on drainage of the vent side of the loop, not the vent itself.

Now I'm trying to come up with a clean solution, as the inspector requested that I make the loop as wide as possible within a 30" cabinet, which means bringing the vent side of the loop down into the joist bay to the right. But, this is in the middle of the joists and the only way to connect them near the bottom of the loop will be to do it under the joists, which is exactly what I was trying to avoid with this admittedly wonky execution.

I understand why it needs to be as high up as possible, but do you know why making the loop wider makes a difference?
 

wwhitney

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Now I'm trying to come up with a clean solution, as the inspector requested that I make the loop as wide as possible within a 30" cabinet
The inspector can suggest that, but can't require it, as it's not mentioned in the IPC section I posted. I suggest you politely decline and keep everything in one joist bay. I don't see any upside, and it would be aggravating for the reasons you mentioned.

If you're redoing it, my idea of a san-tee should be workable.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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