Is Asurion of the homedepot, walmart, amazon protection plans a joke?

Discussion in 'Joke of the day' started by Minni, Nov 19, 2017.

?

in your experience, which of these stores has least-hassle returns, Asurion and all

Poll closed Jan 18, 2018.
  1. Amazon

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Walmart

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. HomeDepot

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Minni

    Minni New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    I just wanted to know which of those stores (homedepot, walmart, amazon) it's safest to buy a $54 corded leaf blower from, and should i even bother with a protection plan, since Asurion's protection plans seem to be mass produced to loads of stores.

    Also, I have this 1950s 2-prong outlet at the side of the house, and may soon have an electrician come to convert it to a normal outlet which can accommodate a 14/3 Coleman cable for the blower. I'm wondering if conversion from a 1950s-style outdoor outlet to a contemp. one can easily be achieved, and if there's anything it makes sense to tell him prior to install.

    I guess this post is more geared toward shopper-savvy guys & electrical guys, but look, that's why i diverted it away from the main forums! :rolleyes:
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Many electric tools today are 2-prong. Those are double-insulated.
     
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  4. Stuff

    Stuff Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Q1) With Amazon make sure that you are buying from them and not a different seller. Amazon's return policies are easy to deal with; other sellers can be a real hassle if they allow returns at all. Walmart and Home Depot are fairly no-hassle as well with returns.

    Q2) With an outdoor outlet there is a straightforward solution as long as everything fits. The receptacle should be replaced with a weather resistant (WR) GFCI along with an in-use cover. Sometimes the GFCI won't fit in an old box so a new box or extension needs installed.
    Let the electrician know what you expect to see when they are finished. If you want flush with brick it would be a lot more work than if clapboard and OK to stick out 8" from the wall.
     
  5. Minni

    Minni New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Thanks for all the info, re: vendors, GFCI etc.etc. An electrician had come for an estimate. He said the 1950s outlet is no good anymore, and that nothing can be put in its place. He gave an estimate of $250 for one outlet and $400 for two outlets, placed wherever i want around the house. Not sure yet what i'll do.
    btw, there's asbestos siding all around the house except for the front. The front is the south side, and that's wood.
     
  6. CheesecakeLover

    CheesecakeLover New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2018
    Location:
    Hopatcong, NJ
    Is he going to replace the line feeding the receptacle too? If not, then what he is doing is a VERY simple procedure. A handyman should be able to do it for cheaper than an electrician. My neighborhood has a webpage where you can find local handymen. If you've never done any electric work, don't do it yourself, but if you're interested in learning, watch what he does over his shoulder so you can learn.

    A weatherproof exterior outlet box costs around $9. You want to get a bubble cover one, which is required in most states now. A regular GFCI receptacle costs around $8. A "weather resistant" GFCI receptacle (which is what you want) costs around $30.

    He will:
    1. Turn off the breaker at the main panel.
    2. Go outside and confirm that the receptacle is indeed off by testing it with a non-contact voltage detector.
    3. Then he'll definitely check it properly with a multimeter.
    4. Unscrew the old exterior receptacle cover.
    5. Yank out the receptacle.
    6. Disconnect wires.
    7. Re-attach wires to the new receptacle. Hot (black wire) to the brass screw. Neutral (white wire) to the silver screw. Ground (bare wire) to the green screw.
    8. Push the receptacle into the box.
    9. Place new exterior receptacle cover in the same location as the old one and screw to the house.
    10. Done.
    Here is a short video that shows the procedure:
     
  7. Minni

    Minni New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    The fiasco is all over & done with. I wound up paying $250 to electrician all for nothing, because the Worx (powerful as it is) was not indicated for this crazy difficult property (too hard to explain) and I should have gotten the cordless, even if it's a tad heavier & requires recharging all the time. I had even worked hours & hours drilling a step-bit thru the wood-frame of 1950s window set into side of garage until i finally managed to get the 100ft. extension cord thru east side of house. That too was for nothing.
     

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