Is $1000 to replace a Compression Angle Valve feeding a Toilet reasonable??

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Jack Jo

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Hi, I started a simple job of replacing the compression angle stop valve feeding my toilet water tank. To do so, I had to pull out the compression ring which I did using a compression ring puller. The challenge was it was super tight. This was a warning sign... as it meant the compression ring had been pulling in tight and thus when I pulled the ring out, it compressed the pipe along the way. Bad news!

Net result, I could not fully tightened the new compression angle valve. After much trying, I decided to pay the weekend callout rate and call in the plumber. I had to call on a largish company in the Tri Cities in WA who provided 24x7 support...

On inspection, the plumber (who was superb) advised that a new pipe/line had to be installed as it was damaged. To do so, he had to cut behind the drywall to access the pipe and install a new t-connector and a short stub-out to feed the toilet. He plugged this work in to his work computer and it spat out an estimate of $620. This was in addition to the $260 callout fee. Wow I thought, nearly $1000 (with tax) is a mighty lot of $s for a small job. NOT THE PLUMBERS FAULT. He was simply going by what the company estimate provided. But what do I do... I needed the water back in the house and I did not have the tools to do it. The plumber is right there... So, I elected to authorise him to proceed with the work. Here is my question?


- Is this seem a reasonable charge (approx. $1000) to replace compression angle stop valve, inclusive of cutting into the back wall to install a new stub-out, with a weekend call out.
- Or, did I get taken? ie. I had no choice and desparate, so they could have charged anything?

I did call the plumbing company, spoke to their manager, and he said this was reasonable and an expected charge for this type of work.

Thank you
 

breplum

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This can get in to the weeds of how much it costs to run a business.
A good business model has all costs built in to their "menu" pricing. So you can't fault this business. The model works for them.
I do not personally recommend paying for a 'diagnostic' call, but...do I waste time going out for free...hell no. I charge a min. of $250. to come look and same rate per hour.
Using a local resource like Nextdoor or even Yelp you might have found some recommendations.
 

Themp

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What you should learn from this DIY project is to be ready and have the materials to cap the line to the toilet when you bent it. This then lets you turn on the water again(toilet is out of commission), and have time to work on a solution yourself.
 

JohnCT

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Hi, I started a simple job of replacing the compression angle stop valve feeding my toilet water tank. To do so, I had to pull out the compression ring which I did using a compression ring puller. The challenge was it was super tight. This was a warning sign... as it meant the compression ring had been pulling in tight and thus when I pulled the ring out, it compressed the pipe along the way. Bad news!

Net result, I could not fully tightened the new compression angle valve. After much trying, I decided to pay the weekend callout rate and call in the plumber. I had to call on a largish company in the Tri Cities in WA who provided 24x7 support...

On inspection, the plumber (who was superb) advised that a new pipe/line had to be installed as it was damaged. To do so, he had to cut behind the drywall to access the pipe and install a new t-connector and a short stub-out to feed the toilet. He plugged this work in to his work computer and it spat out an estimate of $620. This was in addition to the $260 callout fee. Wow I thought, nearly $1000 (with tax) is a mighty lot of $s for a small job. NOT THE PLUMBERS FAULT. He was simply going by what the company estimate provided. But what do I do... I needed the water back in the house and I did not have the tools to do it. The plumber is right there... So, I elected to authorise him to proceed with the work. Here is my question?


- Is this seem a reasonable charge (approx. $1000) to replace compression angle stop valve, inclusive of cutting into the back wall to install a new stub-out, with a weekend call out.
- Or, did I get taken? ie. I had no choice and desparate, so they could have charged anything?

I did call the plumbing company, spoke to their manager, and he said this was reasonable and an expected charge for this type of work.

Thank you

One of the things about plumbing is that you can't hide the actual amount of time you're in the house.

The answer to your question depends on how long they were actually there as a start (some technicians in any trade can be superbly skilled and complete jobs in half the time of other good workers).

Opening the wall and installing a T behind the terlet can be difficult depending on how well the plumbing was originally designed. If the plumber was in and out in an hour and you had to replace the sheetrock yourself, then it seems the computer was generous to the company.

Be aware that most places have a guy like YouTube "sensation" Steve Lav who would probably have done that job complete for half that and done it competently. It's similar to having your car serviced. You may know an excellent auto tech who will repair your car for half of what a factory dealership will.

John
 

LLigetfa

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Hindsight now, but a Saf-T-Kut compression ring splitter should have been the tool of choice. Often when replacing an angle stop, the existing nut and ring can be reused.

It is always good to have a Plan B to avoid a weekend callout.
 

Terry

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We have replaced countless angle stops toilets, lavs and kitchen sinks. Sometimes the copper is compressed because the plumber that did the original install tightened them down too tight. We can cut back the part that was squeezed down too small, and then removing the escutcheon behind the valve and tossing it, we can cut out a bit of drywall and have the snugging nut somewhat buried in the wall. As long as I can get a wrench to tighten it, we're good. That has worked on 99.9% of the cases. There were times we were replacing a dozen stops a week.
I'm sorry your plumber needed to open the wall and start over. I don't think I've ever had to do that with copper.
A 2x4 wall here is normally drilled with 1-3/8" holes to the front side of the stud. The copper is 5/8" OD. It then goes out through 1/2" drywall and then has an escutcheon that is 3/8" thick. That has always given is the distance for installing a new stop.
We will cut back a little copper so that the sleeve finds a full size section of copper. It doesn't have to be at the full size part, as a section of copper is typically past the sleeve and into the stop and doesn't do anything for the seal. We just need it full size where the sleeve is at the "end" of the stop.

You can see in the picture below that the copper goes inside of the stop a bit.
We can toss the escutcheon as it's not helping with the seal anyway.

angle_stop.jpg
 

Terry

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I once tried to reuse the existing nut and ring, but the new stop was not as deep as the old.
The new stops are rarely as deep as the old one. So that's a good reason to use a puller, which also allows the new escutcheons that we like to install. And worse case, we can use a hacksaw blade to trim off a little of the copper if the old nut and sleeve are reused.
 

Terry

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A split escutcheon would be nice for replacing, but removing a non-split escutcheon would be a lot of slow work.

A standard escutcheon comes off easily when torn into bits with pliers. It's pretty thin metal.

shutoff_corragated_replace.jpg


I used a puller on this one.

index.php


This was an iron pipe escutcheon, but just shows you why we like to install new ones.

index.php
 
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