Installing New Upstairs Bathroom - Advice Needed

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Jay_NY

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Alright it’s been a little bit since I last posted. I’ve been working on all sorts of stuff in the bathroom (wiring, ripping out and redoing ceiling) and I’m finally getting it roughed in and ready for the inspector.

I was working on doing my vent for my shower & tub but came up to an issue. I need to run the vent across the wall (left to right) and there are 4 true 2x6 studs in the way.



I don’t think there’s any way I can drill through them. I’m considering using an AAV for that vent and sticking it behind an access panel up next to the rafter. However, it is an external wall and I’d expect that space could see freezing temperatures.

Other option I considered is venting out of the wall, but I’d be about 2 feet from the window so I’d have to snake it up the side of the house a bit and I don’t know if that’s a good option.

I could also maybe drill another hole in my ceiling and run another vent pipe. It would have to be 3” so it doesn’t frost over. I’d really like to not do that since I just put in a vent pipe 4 feet away.

Are there any other clever options you can think of that I should explore here?
 

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Reach4

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I only now looked thru your proposals. If you could inject the shower after the 2-inch drain from the lavatory inserts, you could wet vent with just the lavatory. You would have to keep the trap arms for the tub and shower short enough.

First I had the idea of using the red and green paths. But I then figured that would make the trap arm for the tub too long. So if you just bring the drain for the lavatory over to a spot between the tub drain and she shower drain, you may be fine with no second vent. I may be missing something. That is the orange path, and then ignoring red and green.

Also, you should protect the PVC thru the roof from long-term UV. Paint can do that.
 

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Jay_NY

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Thanks for the response. I think I changed the design from that drawing you referenced.

The toilet is actually wet venting via the sink. I could probably still have the sink drain run over to where you said, but it might be challenging, and of course all of that has to run outside of the wall (which I was planning to box in anyway)

I think what I may do is just run the vent for the shower & tub at a low level outside of the wall until it’s past those 4 studs, then have it cut into the wall and join the vent stack above the flood level. Should be doable.
 

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I think I changed the design from that drawing you referenced.
So you did. I was impressed by your nice pictorial drawing, and I ignored the newer isometric.
 

Jay_NY

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Thanks! Glad someone liked my pretty drawing…it seemed like it was hard for people to read so I did the iso one instead.

So I did what I said I would - ran the vent outside the wall past those 4 studs, then up into the wall to connect to the lav vent, which the toilet also wet vents into, then up out of the roof.

BFCAEC71-DCDC-421C-9371-67F6F6EF140D.jpeg


0BC24087-46DF-45D4-BE58-9F1C1E1A329E.jpeg


Let me know what you think. It feels a little weird to have the vent kind of double back off of the drain line, but it seems like it should work. I used a Vent 90, which is short and makes a hard 90 for that - any issues there?

Before I cement everything together I’ll double check slopes etc, so don’t worry too much about that.
 

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You are supposed to keep the dry vents within 45 degrees of plumb when below 6 inches above the flood level of the fixtures served.

Could you run the shower trap arm diagonally over to the area where the Homer bucket is?

Or use a combo instead of the vent tee, and run the lavatory thru that rather than where it is going now? That turns it into a wet vent, which has easier rules.
 

Jay_NY

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Could you run the shower trap arm diagonally over to the area where the Homer bucket is?

I think I could swing that, I would just have to box in the pipe further out from the wall, but that’s where my steps are going so I could just make sure they extend past there and cover the pipe with the steps

Or use a combo instead of the vent tee, and run the lavatory thru that rather than where it is going now? That turns it into a wet vent, which has easier rules.

I’m not sure what you mean. Are you saying I would just do away with the entire dry vent? Where are you saying to put the Combo? I’m all for simplifying this if possible
 

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I’m not sure what you mean. Are you saying I would just do away with the entire dry vent?
Yes.
Where are you saying to put the Combo? I’m all for simplifying this if possible
You would use the combo or a wye to introduce the lavatory drainage (including wet vent) between the tub and the shower.

You have a maximum trap arm length, with a 2 inch trap and 2 inch pipe, of 8 ft. So that can be a factor too. Where does 8 ft for the tub trap arm come to?
 

Jay_NY

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Yes.

You would use the combo or a wye to introduce the lavatory drainage (including wet vent) between the tub and the shower.

You have a maximum trap arm length, with a 2 inch trap and 2 inch pipe, of 8 ft. So that can be a factor too. Where does 8 ft for the tub trap arm come to?

I tried to use my iPhone to edit the photo for what I think you’re saying. Is this what you’re saying?

46C0ECEA-0918-4C34-8DDC-193394663FB6.jpeg
 

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I tried to use my iPhone to edit the photo for what I think you’re saying. Is this what you’re saying?
Yes, that is one way. Maintain the 1/4 inch per slope from the lavatory trap adapter until at least the vent connection.
Vent connection to the trap arm with IPC can be a santee on its back.
 
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Jay_NY

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Yes, that is one way. Maintain the 1/4 inch per slope from the lavatory trap adapter until at least the vent connection.
Vent connection to the trap arm with IPC can be a santee on its back.

My toilet is to the right (not pictured), about 15 feet before gets to the vent. Would there be any issues with this setup?
 

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Okay I called an audible - will run the vent at 45 degree angle outside of wall then connect it to the main vent inside the wall.

1698B3B0-5256-487E-93DA-9F14E0861F02.jpeg


as far as I know (which isn’t very far), this should be compliant, yea?

I’m fine with it running outside the wall to that point since I was thinking about bumping out that section of wall anyway in the wet room to make a little ledge to set things on.
 

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Mostly compliant I think. Dry vent for the tub and wet vent for the shower. The dry vent to the santee should be two 45s instead of 2 90s. Or alternatively move the santee into the wall, and make that a straight shot for the vent.

In your photo that first 45 looks like it is tilted down too much, but that may just be an illusion. You want to maintain a 2% (1/4" per foot) slope from the U of the trap until the vent.

Logic says two dry vents in this wet vent scheme should be fine, but there may be other interpretations. I am not a plumber. If you put a wye in the 45-degree pipe and ran the lavatory drain horizontally to there to get vented, I think everybody would like that. But your method seems like it should be better. It's just not something I am sure of.
 
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Jay_NY

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Logic says two dry vents in this wet vent scheme should be fine, but there may be other interpretations. I am not a plumber. If you put a wye in the 45-degree pipe and ran the lavatory drain horizontally to there to get vented, I think everybody would like that. But your method seems like it should be better. It's just not something I am sure of.

Sorry I know this is asking a lot, but is there any way you could sketch that for me? I’m having a hard time figuring out exactly what you mean
 

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Anyone else have any feedback on my layout?

<edited>Removed an image I accidentally attached
 
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Reach4

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Sorry I know this is asking a lot, but is there any way you could sketch that for me? I’m having a hard time figuring out exactly what you mean
Check the drawing on page 12: https://www.iccsafe.org/wp-content/uploads/20-18927_GR_2021_Plumbing_Venting_Brochure.pdf

Note that for the toilet last in line, the pipe can fall more than for other types of fixtures. You are not worried that the toilet trap will siphon out, because it is supposed to . Then that trap gets refilled.
 

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Anyone else have any feedback on my layout?
Note that the isometric drawings you attached there are OK for UPC, which is often more demanding than IPC.

I presume "Central New York" refers to the state, so you would be using IPC. ;)
 

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Hey everyone - I’m now cementing my connections and wanted one final check. The main thing I think is okay, but wanted to make sure of us where I have this wye to start the vertical part of my dry vent.

The wye points back upstream. This should be okay though because at most the vent may see a tiny amount of rainwater or snow melt. Anyone see any issues here?
 

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Stuff

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A backwards wye can upset an inspector even if used only for venting. Better to use a combo tee/wye pointed the other way with a 45.
 
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