Installing an 1 1/2" ABS cleanout plug flush in a stud -is there an special wrench to open it?

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Mini Me

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Hi guys

I have an horizontal pipe that ends at what is going to be the edge of a wall (stud behind drywall covered in tiles )
I am planning to install a clean out there just in case, since I already have the hole drilled -which I needed in order to install the horizontal segment in existing framing)

I want the clean out adapter to be flush with the stud (right side of the picture) but the plug (cap) can go in and out as needed. The problem is that I need to be able to remove it and put it back and I guess I will need some type of wrench
This will be a dry segment so I might not need to tighten it up that strong

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The cleanout is installed where the green horizontal pipe to the right joins the vertical yellow pipe. The yellow pipe is a vent. In the middle of the horizontal green pipe where you see the sanitary tee I am discharging the furnace condense pipe that comes from across the hallway from the furnace room, through the ceiling so from that point forward toward the middle of the picture where the shower and the sink drain get vented it is a kind of wet vent but the volume is very low small furnace and the water comes through a standard 1/4" PVC pipe I think)
I need that vent just in case ...
 
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wwhitney

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Not sure about the Canadian codes, but I believe in the US you'd need to have a trap, standpipe, and air gap for connecting the condensate drain.

Is this combustion condensate or AC condensate? If the former, has it been neutralized, and if not, is it allowed to discharge unneutralized into the drain? Certainly no metal drain components should be exposed to unneutralized, undiluted combustion condensate (it's acidic).

A conceptually elegant technique is to connect the condensate drain to the lavatory sink tail piece using a branched tailpiece. Then it takes advantage of the lavatory trap.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

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There are various flush plugs. Some have a threaded piece used to secure a cover plate.

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Your picture shows a long distance between the plug and the hole in the wall. Maybe instead of a short cleanout tee, something that extends the thread closer to the outer wall would be better.
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There are cleanout plug wrenches for plugs with flush/recessed type slots. But I don't know what is going to pull a long distance so that the plug does not drop down on the way to the outer hole.
 
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James Henry

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You are better off extending the face of the cleanout plug to the face of the wall so you can remove it with a pair of channel locks.
The further you set it back in the wall the greater the chance of dropping it in the wall when you try to remove it.
 

Mini Me

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No, I am still working at it one and off
Plumbing is now behind me, and so it is electrical,
I also installed the support for the shower glass panels (finishing that today but this vertical vent (yellow in the picture) is in my way
Once I am done with this I need to pour self leveling cement and install the shower base. After that should go faster I believe
However I have had some landscaping projects that I needed to complete because I did not want to miss the spring season so ... all in all the life go it in the way


@wwhitney There is a air trap in the ceiling practically.
It is a gas furnace/ AC discharge so it is both
It goes like this: pump on the floor, when it gets full the pump pushes the water 7' high. From there it goes through the ceiling but it is not perfectly horizontal since I had to push a piece of PVC pipe through the insulation to traverse the hallway and to reach the bathroom AND I could not run it perfectly horizontal so up there there is a 15' of so wide p trap anyway.
Besides that the pump has a valve that does not allow the water to come back, right ?
https://littlegiant.com/media/245630/998086_vcma_om.pdf

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Mini Me

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You are better off extending the face of the cleanout plug to the face of the wall so you can remove it with a pair of channel locks.
The further you set it back in the wall the greater the chance of dropping it in the wall when you try to remove it.

I just tried to install it and remove it with using long nose pliers and it works decently.
If I drop it in the wall I will buy another one . I can try to stick to it some string so it won't drop
 

wwhitney

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It is a gas furnace/ AC discharge so it is both
So you have a condensing gas furnace with an AC coil, and the acidic condensate from the furnace and the neutral condensate from the AC coil go into the same pump? The acidic condensate should probably go through a neutralizer first.

Funny thig is that I had the wrong setup shown here
But your new setup is the same as the "wrong" setup pictured. The others all show the condensate connecting up stream of a trap; your proposed connection is not upstream of a trap.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Mini Me

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Can't find any references for the neutralizer requirement. The inspectopedia page does not say anything.
The old discharge was into a copper pipe but the wide p-trap I am talking about was not there
 

wwhitney

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The old discharge was into a copper pipe but the wide ptrap I amtalking about was not there
If the discharge was into a copper pipe, and it was not corroded, then that strongly suggested it was not combustion condensate, but just AC condensate. [Or perhaps the furnace has an internal neutralizer, but that's something that would need maintenance from time to time.] Combustion condensate is strongly acidic would corrode copper. Hence the need for a neutralizer with combustion condensate.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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