Installing a 240v NEMA 6-50 outlet in garage

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Bruce Hellstrom

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I'm about to install a 240v receptacle in my garage for a new EV my wife bought. It's a pretty straightforward installation. The circuit breaker box is on the outside wall of the garage and I have access to the wires going straight up from the box from the inside of the garage. My plan is to run NM 6/2 from the breaker box up inside the wall, then transition to a PVC LB conduit body where I will be running SCH 40 conduit and THHN AWG 6 (3 wires, 2 hot and ground) across the garage ceiling and down to the wall-mounted receptacle box which will be in between the 2 garage doors (3 car garage). There will be 3 90 deg turns in the conduit run, so less than 360 deg.

All that's fine, but I just have a question about the breaker. Does this require a GFCI breaker? I've heard the Tesla charging cable has GFCI built-in already, so some people say as long as that's the only device plugged into the outlet, the breaker doesn't need to be GFCI.

Also, if anyone is familiar with Los Angeles County building odes, would this require a permit?
 

wwhitney

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Several comments:

- You will need a torque screwdriver for torquing the connections at each end of your wires to the correct specifications.

- Making splices in an LB could be challenging and I'd have to check the rules on whether it is big enough; a junction box would be a better choice. Coming up with a plan to avoid the splice is worth considering; is your panel surface mounted? A photo or diagram of the run would help.

- CA's electrical code is based on the 2017 NEC (without any of the interim amendments, to my knowledge), which does not require a GFCI for indoor, cord and plug connected EVSEs. The 2020 NEC will require GFCI protection for any receptacle used for an EVSE.

- Definitely requires a permit.

Cheers, Wayne
 

jadnashua

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All EVSEs have ground fault logic built into them from what I've seen as long as they are UL listed.

Keep in mind that an EVSE relies on the 80% rule, so if, say, you have a 50A circuit, the largest EVSE you can install on it would be a 40A unit to account for the derating since it could be charging for extended timeframes.
 

Norcal01

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Technically replacing a light switch requires a permit but running any new circuit requires a permit, Governments do not like being deprived of revenue. :p
 

WorthFlorida

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As wwhitney suggest, changing wire type during a run can be difficult. What is the model number of the EV charger? What does the installation instructions recommend for breaker and wire gauge? The 6 AWG you mentioned, it that AL or CU. I'm assuming its copper. 6 AWG is a fat cat and using the right clamps and covering can get complicated. If it is AL wire, the clamps or wire nut(s) must be AL approved. Pulling three 90 degrees turns (long sweep elbows) in conduit can be another challenge. The final 90 degree turn you may want to use a pull box instead of a 90 degree sweep.

Bottom line is do pull a permit for your safety and when the day comes to where you want to sell the home, there will be no issues. Also, do try to go from end to end in conduit and no splices in between.
 
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