How to move studs to fit tub/shower valve?

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Geran

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Hi,

My wife and I are renovating our spare bathroom and demoing part of the walls where the old tub/shower was.

This is the wall that the old tub/shower valve was on. One stud is burned really bad from someone trying to solder there and there is an electrical wire running through the wall to a couple of outlets on the other side of the wall.

Old tub/shower valve area

geran-01.jpg


The other side of the shower is a potential location to reroute everything but I'm confused about how to move things around to make it work. This wall is a 2x6 wall with the master bathroom on the other side of the wall.

New valve location

geran-02.jpg


I planned to cut the stud to the right of the PVC pipe. Add a horizontal brace above the PVC pipe and put a vertical brace closer to the PVC down to the bottom plate. This would give me a couple of extra inches of clearance to mount the new mixing valve.

R10000-PFT-MFWS-B1.jpg


My issue isn't the PVC, it is the stud that is the issue on either wall. The centerline of the new valve is 14.5" from the outside wall and it needs 2" on each side of the centerline which puts it right on the stud.

My question is how would y'all handle this situation?
 
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WorthFlorida

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Wall studs can be up to 24" center using stud grade 2x"s. Moving the stud over a few inches would be of no problem.
 

Terry

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One thing I notice is the combo instead of a santee for the lav drain. It should be a santee there.

I often will install studs near valves in better locations. I'm not married to what is already there.
 

Geran

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One thing I notice is the combo instead of a santee for the lav drain. It should be a santee there.

I often will install studs near valves in better locations. I'm not married to what is already there.
Can you explain this a little more?

This is what connects the master bathroom sink to the house drain.

geran-03.jpg
 

wwhitney

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The fitting in your picture is a combo, or combination wye plus 45. It should be a sanitary tee for proper venting of your sink; the combo interferes with venting [look up the trap weir rule for more info]. So now is a good time to fix it. [In the very unlikely case that the vertical pipe is a drain from a fixture above, and that the sink drain is vented on the other side of the wall, the combo would be fine.]

You could jog the vent over to the left a little while you are at it to make more room, using two 45s. The vent isn't allowed to go horizontal until 6" above the sink flood rim, but if you really want it out of that stud bay at a lower elevation, it's possible. You'd just need to drill a hole through the stud at a 45 degree angle, which is tricky to do but should be OK if that wall is not a bearing wall.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Geran

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The fitting in your picture is a combo, or combination wye plus 45. It should be a sanitary tee for proper venting of your sink; the combo interferes with venting [look up the trap weir rule for more info]. So now is a good time to fix it. [In the very unlikely case that the vertical pipe is a drain from a fixture above, and that the sink drain is vented on the other side of the wall, the combo would be fine.]
There are no drains above this combination in this wall. I will fix it with a sanitary tee as suggested (something like this). There is no vent on the other side of the wall for this sink drain. Thank you @wwhitney and @Terry for this suggestion, I would have never known that.

You could jog the vent over to the left a little while you are at it to make more room, using two 45s. The vent isn't allowed to go horizontal until 6" above the sink flood rim, but if you really want it out of that stud bay at a lower elevation, it's possible. You'd just need to drill a hole through the stud at a 45-degree angle, which is tricky to do but should be OK if that wall is not a bearing wall.

Cheers, Wayne
Thankfully none of the walls on the interior of the home are load-bearing walls, I had a structural engineer out for another renovation I did and had them confirm this for me. Thank you for the suggestion with the 45s and moving the wall slightly to make room. Once I get the fixtures in, I will see what I need to do for sure before finalizing my plan.
 
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