How do you seal plastic overflow drain hole on bathroom sink?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by stouto, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. stouto

    stouto New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Had an experienced plumber (30 years experience) install a new replacement Briggs Homer 3002 lavatory in my bathroom on November 11, 2011. A new supply line, P-Trap, and pop-up drain stopper was also installed at the same time. I have had plumbers come out three times to fix a small leak at the bottom of the sink/plastic overflow drain opening without success. The pop-up assembly has been replaced and reinstalled with new putty several times. This has been a sink from hell and is giving me nightmares.

    The Briggs CS rep asked if silicone sealant was used on the drain pipe that goes into the plastic overflow opening on the bottom of the sink, and if the plumbers had installed sinks with plastic overflows on the bottom of the sink. The Briggs rep said that they would send me a new sink but they would not tell me how to the plastic overflow hole should be sealed. . I know that no silicone was used since I watch them try to fix the leak. Don't know if they have installed plastic overflow type sinks in the past . I have used these plumbers several time in the past and they are competent. Sink installation and other plumbing work is what they do every day.

    Could you please tell me how to seal the bottom of the sink/plastic overflow outlet on a enameled steel lavatory?
     
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The first thing I would say is that I would have done everything in my power to convince you NOT to use that sink. There is no reason for that fitting to leak. It seals to the sink with one gasket and the drain fitting seals to it, JUST LIKE it would with a "one piece" sink. Therefore, either it is defective or the plumber is doing something wrong, and if that is the case he would have done the same with ANY sink.
     
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  4. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Since the nut needs to be fairly tight to squeeze the mack gasket, it sounds like Briggs is suggesting to add silicone to the picture. Some plumbers on the forum swear by silicone for all sinks, others do not agree.

    Have you been able to observe specifically and exactly where the water is leaking? Did the plumber add putty or silicone to the threads of the drain body??
     
  5. stouto

    stouto New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Photo of sink overflow and leak

    Location of leak is shown in photos
     

    Attached Files:

  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    Occupation:
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    IT appears to be between the nut and the gasket, so it may NOT be a problem with the "plastic drain fitting", but rather a problem with the drain fitting installation. I am not sure if he applied pipe dope to the fitting's thread, but that is usually required to get a good seal on the gasket. I will reiterate however, that I would NEVER have recommended that, or any other "pressed steel enameled", sink.
     
  7. stouto

    stouto New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Thanks. Had two sinks in bathroom, one had to be replaced so I purchased the same type of sink so I would not have to replace both of them. Pipe dope was used on the threads of the drain pipe. Would silicone provide a better seal and where should it be applied.

    The Briggs rep said "Please be aware however, that while the drain assembly needs to be connected at the drain as you are looking down at the installed sink, the pipe running into the overflow should be sealed as well." Not sure what this means.
     
  8. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I don't see any, or enough, sealant on the threads, looking just below the nut. Back the nut off, drop down the washers, then using your finger, mash putty into the threads. Don't worry...this is not going to compromise the plastic sink. Now tighten the nut back up. That tell-tale drop of water shows that the leak is not between the gasket and the sink bottom, but down the middle...along the threads.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2011
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; the pipe running into the overflow should be sealed as well." Not sure what this means.

    It means the TOP of the plastic piece also has to be sealed against the sink at the overflow opening. Now you are in a "see-saw" situation. You replaced sink 1 with one matching sink 2, but when sink 2 fails, and it will, you will have to buy one to match sink 1. Therefore, you will NEVER be able to have two GOOD sinks.
     
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