How do I desolder delta tub spout adapter from copper pipe or...?

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KDW

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Hi all,
Novice here. I looked at various threads on this topic, but I’m still confused on how best to tackle my issue.

I want to remove the brass delta adapter to put a delta slip on tub spout with a plastic insert with o-ring and set screw. I do not want to just get a different spout that fits this adapter. After 15 emails with Delta, they still wouldn’t give me a list of spouts that use this adapter and I want to use the one that came with the trim I
Had already purchased.

my problem: if I cut it off, the pipe will only be about an inch long, which will be too short to reach the o-ring.

I attempted to unsolder the spout yesterday with a Bernzomatic propane torch, but got nowhere. The torch freaks me out a bit (the tub and surround are plastic) so maybe I didn’t heat it long enough? Should I apply flux to desolder? Also should I clamp the wrench and try to loosen the fitting while hitting it with the torch, or remove the heat and then try? I assume if I do attach the wrench it’s likely to get too hot.

if I do cut off the adapter, can I solder a straight copper fitting on to extend the pipe or will this lead to a poor seal with the o-ring? the fitting would be right where the o-ring needs to seal.

would it be easier to cut the pipe from behind (3rd pic) above the 90 degree fitting and just replace the whole thing? I have access, but not enough space to solder safely. You can see in third pic where previous install charred the wood and there’s only about six inches between that opening and the sink to work in. Can I use a compression fitting or some other type of fitting there? I’m afraid it gets jostled too much to keep the seal (copper pipe is a bit loose).

any suggestions are welcome.
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thanks
KDW
 

wwhitney

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would it be easier to cut the pipe from behind (3rd pic) above the 90 degree fitting and just replace the whole thing? I have access, but not enough space to solder safely.
If desoldering doesn't work or is too risky near the plastic tub surround, then yes.

You have enough room to solder safely. Wet down the plywood before using the flame. And get yourself a soldering heat shield, put the heat shield between the work and the wet combustibles. Something like this (not a particular recommendation, just the first example I found):

https://www.amazon.com/ZetexPlus-Welding-Brazing-Plumbers-Pad/dp/B07VMP4QJ9/

Either way you get to the spout you need, I think strapping the copper pipe to the plywood would be a good idea (just make sure your fasteners don't go through the plywood all the way).

Cheers, Wayne
 
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Mr tee

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If you do as you plan, the slip-fit spout you put on probably won't be as good as a Delta. I expect somebody here can point you to a Delta that will work and it will be a much easier job.
 

Reach4

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I attempted to unsolder the spout yesterday with a Bernzomatic propane torch, but got nowhere. The torch freaks me out a bit (the tub and surround are plastic) so maybe I didn’t heat it long enough? Should I apply flux to desolder? Also should I clamp the wrench and try to loosen the fitting while hitting it with the torch, or remove the heat and then try? I assume if I do attach the wrench it’s likely to get too hot.
Make sure all water is out before starting.

Remove the o-ring before applying heat. Have a friend join you, and use two torches. Don't use the pencil tip torch, but the big tip. Have a box or something to catch the adapter when it comes flying off due to you pulling. Don't hold the adapter with a tool, until you are ready to grab.

A MAPP gas torch can heat hotter.

You made it clear that a way to find other spouts that use that same adapter would not be helpful, because you want to use something else. Too bad. The spouts that use that adapter are much easier to get adjusted right.
 

KDW

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If desoldering doesn't work or is too risky near the plastic tub surround, then yes.

You have enough room to solder safely. Wet down the plywood before using the flame. And get yourself a soldering heat shield, put the heat shield between the work and the wet combustibles. Something like this (not a particular recommendation, just the first example I found):

https://www.amazon.com/ZetexPlus-Welding-Brazing-Plumbers-Pad/dp/B07VMP4QJ9/

Either way you get to the spout you need, I think strapping the copper pipe to the plywood would be a good idea (just make sure your fasteners don't go through the plywood all the way).

Cheers, Wayne

thanks Wayne, I decided to go with option 4….
Cut the pipe from the back and replace the whole thing. Haven’t done it yet though. I plan to attach to the plywood for sure.

I will then try my hand at removing the stuck ring lock nut ? Holding the cartridge in the valve so I can replace the cartridge….

thanks for your advice.
KDW
 

Reach4

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Cut the pipe from the back and replace the whole thing.
If you want the copper pipe longer, cut thru the adapter too. I expect the solder is pretty much all at the end away from the wall.
 

KDW

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If you do as you plan, the slip-fit spout you put on probably won't be as good as a Delta. I expect somebody here can point you to a Delta that will work and it will be a much easier job.

I have no doubt you are right. Unfortunately, I had already purchased the Delta shower/tub trim kit before I found this forum and this was already the second one I purchased, when I realized after the first purchase that the valves were manufacturer-specific. o_O.

I ended up cutting off the down spout near the valve and connecting a new hard copper pipe with a compression joint and then using a SB elbow.
I just tested it and so far no leaks.

Im also going to put a strip or two of 2x1 so I can anchor the pipes. Previous install was flapping in the wind except for a giant glob of silicone around the inside of the tub spout pipe.

I’m going to leave the panel off for a few days because the pipe I cut off was not perfectly plum so not a perfect straight line fit with the new pipe at the compression fitting. Will this be a problem over time?


image.jpg
 

Jadnashua

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There's a fair amount of mass in that adapter, so you do have to heat it a bit. When you then grab it with some pliers to try to get it off of the pipe, that mass then will cool the fitting some and take some more heat to keep the solder molten. What may work better at removing it would be to be gripping it with some pliers while heating it. To get a slip on spout to then fit onto the pipe and actually seal well, you have to get nearly all of the solder off of the pipe, so yes, cutting it out when you have access from the rear is probably your best bet.

You do want to get the pipe in the wall anchored well. That's often done with a drop-ear el that you can screw to some blocking You can use some pipe clamps attached to blocking if you want to just use a standard elbow.
 
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