Help me to find a proper water heater and tank for a apartment building in Washington

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DNAG

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Hello!

I have designed a hot water system for a 111 room apartment building located in Washington. Here are the design data:

Sink: 113 nos
Lavatory: 111 nos
Bathtub: 111 nos
Washing M/C: 15nos.

Total HW Fixture Unit: 588
Total Supply Demand: 142gpm
Avg Permissible Frictional loss per 100ft: 5.01psi
Peak Demand: Morning 2hr.

I want to use a centralized water heating system but not sure how to choose it. Can anyone please help me on this?
 

hj

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contact the water heater company and have them give you a recommendation. Regardless of what they recommend it could be wrong, because, ultimately your requirements will depend on your occupancy mix. As a worst case, you could have 222 people trying to take showers withing a 10 or 15 minute period, if there are 2 to a unit and they all get up and shower at about the same time.
 

DNAG

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Surely I can contact manufacturer but I want to know the design prespective
 

Dj2

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If you are in India, it would be wiser to ask a local plumber.
 

Dana

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If you are in India, it would be wiser to ask a local plumber.

The designer is in India, but the building is in Washington.

Designing a centralized hot water service for 111 apartments is outside the expertise of a "local plumber" anyway. This one is for a competent mechanical systems engineer/designer, but they need to start with a more complete specification.

Fpr instance, it would be useful to have an actual peak number for that "Peak Demand: Morning 2hr." The approach taken will differ if the anticipated peak is averaging 50 gallons per minute of 115F water for two hours vs. 200 gallons per minute of 140F water for those two hours.
 
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