Gas Range Clock bonkers

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Ken Tannenbaum1, Aug 12, 2020.

  1. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

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    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    Installed a new range last month. The clock speeds up, we reset it and it speeds up again. Today it was set accurately about 8am, it's now 11:30 but the clock reads 3:10. I understand the frequency changr can make a difference but thought I'f check here. Thanks.
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    "The frequency changer"? What frequency changer?

    The clock is going about 2x fast, as if whatever you are doing to provide power is generating a lot of second harmonic.
     
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  4. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

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  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2013
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    I would be wondering if a dimmer or some other thing was generating a pulse in your house on that circuit. Got an oscilloscope?

    With an extension cord, you could try powering the range with an outlet on a different circuit, preferably one on the other leg of your power. In the attached sketch, breakers in the red positions, in most breaker boxes, are on a different leg than the ones in the blue positions. A two-pole breaker uses both legs.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
  6. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

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    I powered the range from a different circuit and found the clock timed properly overnight. I also spoke with the power company which said there’s been no change in frequency on their part. Last,it’s now plugged into the “problem” circuit and I’ll see what happens today. Worst case will be re-routing the connection. Anyway, thanks for the thoughts.
     
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Was the old range using a 3-prong plug? New ones are designed for a 4-prong plug, and if you want to use it with a 3-prong, you must follow the instructions to the wiring in the range's manual and strap the neutral/ground.

    Your clock is very likely run off of 120vac, while the stove has 240. To get 120vac, it needs neutral. If the ground/neutral are not done right , it could give you some issues.

    Long ago when I lived in Germany, I had one clock that would be accurate on Friday, but off on Monday, then, if you did nothing, it would gradually go back to being right by Friday again...my theory was that the people working the weekend were not maintaining the frequency properly, and when the normal shift got back in on Monday, they slowly tweaked the frequency so that their synchronous clock moved back to being correct.

    That can be overcome by using a digital clock that uses its own oscillator, but the one I noticed this on counted the power cycles (in Germany, it's 50Hz, or supposed to be!). FWIW, a clock circuit that counts the acv cycles is cheaper, so that is a factor. Some devices designed for international use may have a switch to set for 50/60Hz, and I didn't run the numbers...if yours has, and is not set to the right frequency, the clock would be off...since it's running fast, it could be set to 50Hz rather than 60Hz, so every second, it would count an extra 10 pulses, or 20% fast.
     
  8. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

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    Hey, Thanks. Those Germans know how to have fun and mess with clocks too. Our service provider told me it's very rare that they alter the frequency and that has not occured recently. Here's the deal. The stove is propane, not electric, so it's only 120V. The short story is we changed cirucit yesterday morning and the clock worked fine, then last night we plugged it back into the "problem" outlet and now it's 10 hours later and the time is correct. It was an anamoly, I have no explanation for why it's back to normal but it is. Again, thanks.
     
  9. fitter30

    fitter30 Well-Known Member

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    I going to recommend plugging a alarm clock in that outlet or buy one at walley world. In the past when i thought power was flickering and couldn't catch it a cheap alarm clock could catch it by blinking the time.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
  10. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    If it recurs, you might try an EMI filter in that supply line. However an incorrect clock on a stove is not that big of a deal.
     
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
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    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    IF the clock circuit actually is one that counts the acv cycles, it's possible that it could have logic to determine by itself if it is plugged into 50 or 60 Hz power supply...it might have gotten confused, and thought it was on a 50Hz supply, and ran its timekeeping based on that. When you unplugged it, then replugged it in, it got it right. Older ones relied on a physical switch to direct the logic so it could keep time correctly.
     
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