Extendable dishwasher plumbing

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ChrisBeall

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I'm replacing a dishwasher in my home. Once the new one is in, I'd like to be able to pull it out of the cavity without disconnecting the supply and drain lines so I can test for the source of any leak or do repairs, which seem to require access from the sides of the unit.

So I'd like to install the unit in such a way that there is extra slack in the supply and drain lines that would let me pull the dishwasher out without disconnecting those lines. I've though of a few ways to do that, but the space is confined and I don't want to bend flex supply line or the drain tubing more than they can handle or twist the lines as the machine is moved in or out.

Before I miss something obvious (or give the idea up) does anyone have any suggestions for accomplishing this?

Some specifics to my environment, though I'm really just seeking general ideas on extendable plumbing that retracts into a confined space:

I'm in NY state, but not NY city.

The current plumbing all comes directly from the basement below the kitchen, not through the adjacent sink supply and drain. A separate 3/8" copper supply line went from a shutoff to the old dishwasher, snaking from its rear to its front where the inlet fitting was. The drain line went from the bottom center of the machine to the back, then through a high loop flat against the back of the machine, dropping through the floor into the basement, where it connected to copper with a swing check valve, then joined the sink drain line at a point well below the sink trap.

The new dishwasher (Bosch) has plumbing connections at its bottom rear, inset 2" from the back of the machine. The instructions all assume that both plumbing lines will go to the side, running through that inset, into the under-sink area, to be married to the sink connections. In my case the under-sink area has a false floor about 6" above the real one. It's used for storage.
 

WorthFlorida

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For supply line you can use a stainless steel braided hose. They come in various lengths so you can snake it anywhere and down to the basement. The excess and be coiled up and hung from a floor joist. A Bosch DW you'll see the drain hose on the side of the machine with a high loop about 8" from the bottom of the wash tub. It does not need to make another high loop behind the machine.
Drain wise going down below with a check valve is really not a good idea. If the DW is next to the sink cabinet, connect it to a disposal or tail piece. It is only held in with a hose clamp. Very easy to disconnect if you need to pull out the machine.

I just replaced my 12 year old Bosch with nothing wrong with it. Never had to pull it out. I replaced it with a Samsung with leak detection. It has a flat pan like base. Should water leak it will puddle and the detector would shut the unit off. I've had 5 homes and replaced a few dishwashers and for family and never had one leak.

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ChrisBeall

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For supply line you can use a stainless steel braided hose. They come in various lengths so you can snake it anywhere and down to the basement. The excess and be coiled up and hung from a floor joist.
I tried this, just holding the hose in my hands. Although it will flex, it will not twist any more than a rigid pipe would. If I coil the hose, then hold one end firm, then try to extend the coil, the free end wants (strongly!) to twist, one full turn for each turn of the original coil. I tried several variations with similar results. The only configuration that would extend without twisting was a zig-zag in a single plane. For example, if the hose is laid flat against the floor, then zig-zagged, you can clamp both ends and move them toward or away from each other without stress on you or the hose (within its radius limit...). Try to lift any part of the hose off the floor and you will quickly encounter serious twisting stress at the connectors It doesn't matter if the zig-zag is in a different plane, such as vertical alongside a machine, any movement outside that plane creates twist.

A solution would be a swivel joint at one end of the hose, allowing rotation. Does such a thing exist (hot water, street pressure)?

I keep trying different configurations, but I think I discovered a rule of physics. Although a larger space might allow use of the zig-zag technique, I'm rethinking my desire to be able to move the dishwasher without disconnecting plumbing. Am I quitting too soon?
 

WorthFlorida

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If it doesn't seem possible to snake the water line as you want, leave as is. Without pictures it is hard to understand the entire situation.

As I stated earlier, DW's are very stable, leaks are probably non existent both in plumbing and the machine. Needing to pull it out before its end of life will be pretty slim. I've pulled mine a few times because or remodeling and one time I had mold from a leaky window frame to get access to the drywall. Each time it needed to be pulled completely to get it out of the way. With a leak problem, it usually has to come completely out and to get access to the bottom because it usually needs to be flipped on its side. New DW's are very low to the floor and for noise control, it is sealed up with access panels.

Above I mention I just replaced my Bosch with a Samsung and I inadvertently and unknowingly nicked the drain hose on the install that leaked the first time using machine. Two days later with a replacement hose, I had to completely remove the machine, positioned the DW on its side to get access to the bottom of it. In the cabinet position after height and level adjustments, there was only about 1" of space between the floor and the machine.
 
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