Does PVC need to "bottom out" inside fitting.

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by NTM, Dec 18, 2020.

  1. NTM

    NTM New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2020
    Location:
    Illinois
    I primed and cemented PVC pipe and fitting (1.5 inch bathtub drain) according to manufacturer's instructions and then quickly pushed the pipe in as hard as I could with a quarter turn.

    However, as shown in the first picture, the PVC pipe went in about 1/2 inch and did not "bottom out" the full 3/4-ish depth of the fitting. The picture I took shows the inside of the fitting where there is a small ridge and a 1/4 inch purple ring.

    My worry is that the ridge will trap hair or debris that goes down the drain or that the drain is a weak connection.

    Do I need to buy a new drain piece and start over? If so, how do I get the PVC to "bottom out" inside the fitting?
    IMG_5401.jpg IMG_5402.jpg
     
  2. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

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    Sep 23, 2004
    Occupation:
    plumbing - fire suppression - boiler inspector
    Location:
    New York
    Yes it has to " bottom out"
     
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  4. Tuttles Revenge

    Tuttles Revenge In the Trades

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2014
    In order to get a good joint is in the prep. When you cut the pipe end you want it to be square. The end of the pipe should then be chamfered/beveled. In a fairly quick succession, you should prime the socket of the fitting and the portion of the pipe that will be socketed, and soon after add your cement/glue to both the fitting socket and the pipe. With both still wet, insert and twist at the same time. You may need to press the fitting down harder by placing either end on the ground and adding your body weight, tho generally for 1.5" that isn't needed.

    Since that is a unique fitting, you may want to recover it by removing the pipe from the fitting.. easier said than done, unless you have the right Reed Reemer tool commonly referred to as a Ram Bit.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2021
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    IL
    I would leave it if it will hold a vacuum. Not sure how I would test for that. I am not a plumber or other pro.
     
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    If your cement is getting old or you didn't keep the cap on tight, a lot of the solvents may have evaporated so that it doesn't melt the plastic enough to make it fit. A PVC joint is called a solvent welded joint. It melts the plastic, and once enough of the solvent evaporates, it locks things in place...You need a good coat on both the pipe and the fitting. Because the socket in the fitting is tapered, that does two things, helps to keep things centered, but also requires enough of the plastic to melt so it will fit in. The primer helps to soften the surface, and you need to apply the cement fairly quickly to finish it up. If you apply the primer, and wait too long, the surface will harden up again and you won't get the same effect. Most say make the joint within 5-minutes after applying the primer, and with minimal delay after applying the cement.
     
  7. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida The wife is still training me.

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  8. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    The solvents in the cement literally melt the plastic, making it possible to seat the pipe. Some of that melted plastic will get pushed up into the socket by the edge of the pipe and help round over that transition to the end. If your cement is old, it tends to get thicker, and will eventually harden or turn into a gel. At some point, there's not enough solvents in there to melt the plastic, and you will have a hard time trying to bottom it out. Also note that because the socket is tapered, until enough of the solvent has evaporated, if you don't hold things together, the pipe will try to back itself out of the socket. Depending on how much cement you use, that time can vary. If you go away to prepare say the next segment, when you go back, things may have moved and now, the solvent has evaporated, and it's locked there. Can be really annoying!

    WHen setting something like a toilet flange, sometimes, I'll just set a box of tile on top to hold it in place until it becomes firm and will stay there on its own.
     
  9. kevreh

    kevreh New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2018
    Location:
    Virginia
    I wouldn’t worry about it, as others mentioned the pipe has welded together.
     
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