DIY advice for Infinity drain install and venting

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Dan Park

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Hi all, I'm currently moving a shower around and redoing the plumbing in my bathroom. My plan is to do a curb less shower. So after the plumbing, I'll pour the slab in the shower area about 2in lower. Then I'll use deck mud to make the slope to the drain.

As for the plumbing, my plan is to do something similar to this diagram.
S0g0o.jpg

It's my understanding that the trap arm length should be at least twice the diameter of the pipe diameter. In my case I'm using 2" ABS so my trap arm will be at least 4" long.

For the venting, can I use a 2in/1.5/2in sani tee for the venting to be 1.5 inches or does it have to be 2in?

Any other suggestions with using Infinity drains?

Thanks everybody!
 

Terry

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Kind of an old picture of a shower drain. Now they require the drain to rise vertically from a combo or wye fitting until six inches above the flood level of the fixture served.
At least they would require a wye fitting tilted above the flood level on he line, and other fittings need to be at least medium 90's and not the pictured vent fittings, which can only be used above the flood levels. I don't even bother having vent fittings on my van.

And yes on the 4" or more on the trap arm between trap and venting.
Also, that drawing shows a 1.5" trap which we aren't allowed to use for showers. Nice drawing, but wrong.
 

Dan Park

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Thanks Terry for your explanation!

Just so that I'm understanding you about the flood plane statement u made, are you saying that the horizontal portion of the venting (circled in pink) needs to be at least 6" above the finished top of the shower drain as opposed to under it like in the 1st picture?
S0g0o.jpg


Also I should use medium 90s for the horizontal venting, got it!
Yes on the 2" ABS shower drain, but can I use 1.5" ABS for the venting? Or does to have to be 2" venting?
 

Terry

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The horizontal needs to be above the flood levels, unless you are wet venting with a bathroom lav run with 2" on the wet portion.
The dry vents can be 1.5"
 

Dan Park

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Yes I understand now, thank you for that clarification!

I guess I will scratch the vent immediately after the shower P trap and do something like this:

20220201_140422.jpg


Any potential problems with this scenario?

All the 1.5" piping for the sink/lav is original.
Everything after/upstream from the first 3/2/3 combo wye main line will be new.
I added the 2" vertical vent off the 1.5" just in case for the in wall concealed toilet. I hope that's ok.

The shower drain is less than 6ft away from the first vent stack but I've decided to add the second vent stack behind the shower just in case for the shower and toilet.

Sorry if this is super amateur but trying to get my head around proper venting with today's updated codes and making sure I have enough make up air for the water to go down properly.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I try to plan my vents to come up vertically in one of the walls of the shower so that I get that vertical rise. But all vent fittings that are under the "Flood Level" of the fixture should be drainage fittings just like if they were a drain. That way if they do fill up with waste, they can flow back down to the drain. That also implies that the vent in that area would have drainage slope.
 

John Gayewski

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Did you get a waiver to have a "curbless" shower? They aren't legal without a handicapped (can you even say handicapped anymore?) waiver. Pretty sure your going to want some documentation on that one too.
 

Dan Park

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Did you get a waiver to have a "curbless" shower? They aren't legal without a handicapped (can you even say handicapped anymore?) waiver. Pretty sure your going to want some documentation on that one too.
Interesting, I've never heard of that before. I will look into that, thanks!
 

Jeff H Young

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Did you get a waiver to have a "curbless" shower? They aren't legal without a handicapped (can you even say handicapped anymore?) waiver. Pretty sure your going to want some documentation on that one too.
I've never done a curbless shower is that UPC , IPC or both John? Also never heard of a handicap waiver But ill play that card !
 

wwhitney

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Any potential problems with this scenario?
Yes, your drawing has a number of issues.

First, is the 3x3x2 wye where the shower drain comes in oriented vertically as drawn, or do you actually intend to have it horizontal? If vertical, you've violated the trap weir rule, which says that a drain can't turn downward before it's vented (more precisely, the vent has to be attached before it falls one pipe diameter).

Second, you can install the 3" horizontal extension to the right of the 3x3x2 wye as a possible cleanout extension or for future use, but it does not properly vent the shower. A dry vent has to come off vertically and stay vertical until 6" above the fixture flood rim. Now if the right hand 2" stack had a lavatory attached to it, then your arrangement would be an acceptable wet vent.

Also, your WC is not vented, you would need to vent the shower before it joins the WC, so that the shower can wet vent the WC. Or, again, if your right hand 2" stack had a lavatory attached to it, that lav could wet vent both the shower and the WC.

Lastly, on the left hand 3x3x2 combo, only the actual lav drain, and the vent on its san-tee on the left are useful. The central 1.5" vent, and the 2" jog you put in don't do anything and can't be used to vent the WC or the shower.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Showers are not required to have a threshold. In 2009 the UPC required it But by 2015 the wording changed from 411.6 "a shower Must have a threshold" to 408.5 "If a shower has a threshold".
 

John Gayewski

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Showers are not required to have a threshold. In 2009 the UPC required it But by 2015 the wording changed from 411.6 "a shower Must have a threshold" to 408.5 "If a shower has a threshold".
Reading over the code a little more. I'm thinking your correct. A shower without a threshold is not referenced.
 

Jeff H Young

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My newest code book is 2000 so thanks Tuttles ! Learned on this site how to acess codes on the web .
Learned something else today Iowa is UPC code never checked that.
 

Dan Park

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Yes, your drawing has a number of issues.

First, is the 3x3x2 wye where the shower drain comes in oriented vertically as drawn, or do you actually intend to have it horizontal? If vertical, you've violated the trap weir rule, which says that a drain can't turn downward before it's vented (more precisely, the vent has to be attached before it falls one pipe diameter).

Second, you can install the 3" horizontal extension to the right of the 3x3x2 wye as a possible cleanout extension or for future use, but it does not properly vent the shower. A dry vent has to come off vertically and stay vertical until 6" above the fixture flood rim. Now if the right hand 2" stack had a lavatory attached to it, then your arrangement would be an acceptable wet vent.

Also, your WC is not vented, you would need to vent the shower before it joins the WC, so that the shower can wet vent the WC. Or, again, if your right hand 2" stack had a lavatory attached to it, that lav could wet vent both the shower and the WC.

Lastly, on the left hand 3x3x2 combo, only the actual lav drain, and the vent on its san-tee on the left are useful. The central 1.5" vent, and the 2" jog you put in don't do anything and can't be used to vent the WC or the shower.

Cheers, Wayne
Thanks so much Wayne for that explanation! I think my DIY brain was able to understand most if not all of it.

On the 1st point, if I added a vent 5" after the shower p trap and at least 6" above my curbless shower flood plane as drawn below in black ink,, you're saying this would properly allow for venting of the shower and WC? Makes sense to me this way as well.
20220202_092401.jpg


On the 2nd point, yes I see your point on adding the lav on the right side vent stack but unfortunately it's on the back wall and not on the wall I need the sink to be.
The only reason I wanted to add the right side 2nd vent stack was to wet vent the shower and toilet and to add a cleanout since this is the beginning of my 3" abs main line to the street.
So if I add the shower drain venting as stated above in the drawing, should I get rid of that 2nd vent stack and cleanout since there would be no need for venting at that point? I guess I could add a cleanout on the shower vent vertical stack as well.

On the 3rd point, I figured the 2nd stack would take care of that but I guess not from what you're saying.

On the last point, I figured if I added more "throughput" it would help the WC venting but I guess not from what your saying, lol.

Thanks again and looking forward to your response!
 

wwhitney

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You could do it like in the attached drawing. The drawing is an elevation, i.e. up-down the page is always vertical. Note that the vent takeoff for the shower dry vent has to be a combo, but you've drawn a san-tee on its back; that's not allowed under the UPC.

The 2" shower trap arm (from trap to vent-takeoff) is limited to 60", and the 1-1/2" lav trap arm (from trap under the sink to the san-tee) is limited to 42". Each trap arm is also limited to one pipe diameter total fall. Oh, and if it's more convenient to jog the vertical section of the 1.5" lav vent or drain (since your original drawing had the san-tee farther to the left), you can do that with a pair of 45s.

Cheers, Wayne

20220202_092401.jpg
 

Dan Park

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I try to plan my vents to come up vertically in one of the walls of the shower so that I get that vertical rise. But all vent fittings that are under the "Flood Level" of the fixture should be drainage fittings just like if they were a drain. That way if they do fill up with waste, they can flow back down to the drain. That also implies that the vent in that area would have drainage slope.
I think I understand what you're saying. Correct me if I'm wrong but if I can't get a vertical stack off my shower drain for whatever reason, just make sure to use med/long 90s on the horizontal sloped pipes going to an eventual vertical stack off the shower drain.

I think this is my dilemma since I don't think I can get a vertical stack immediately off my shower drain going to the mainline but I can do a short horizontal run to a wall and then go vertical before joining the main line. This is a slab on grade bathroom so having to deal with footings and dirt removal is not the easiest of jobs, lol.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Correct me if I'm wrong but if I can't get a vertical stack off my shower drain for whatever reason, just make sure to use med/long 90s on the horizontal sloped pipes going to an eventual vertical stack off the shower drain

Yes. The vent wants to be vertical from the point of connection to the drain, Unless Prevented by Structural Conditions, then the vent can be installed horizontally with proper drainage fittings to the point where it can become vertical. Ultimately its going to be your inspector who determines whether you meet that threshold (pun intended)

As further useless information. The change in wording for exclusion of a threshold was inserted in the 2012 UPC.
 
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