Critique my single vanity to double vanity plan

Users who are viewing this thread

ChrisMDL

New Member
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Roebling, NJ
3FAD20C0-7E88-489B-90FC-E30B40587485.jpeg
BDB3A312-5129-4A0C-9C7B-BBA9BDB9B933.jpeg


Hey all, I’m hoping you all can tell me if I’m on the right track here. I have 2” copper drains and I’d like to convert a single vanity to a double vanity.

should I do all the PVC in 2” and stub 2” out of the wall? How do I adapt to the 1 1/2” tubular for the sinks?

also is the plan I drew up going to work? In the drawing where is says Fernco, I mean a fully banded coupling meant to go from copper to PVC. I am getting this inspected but doing it myself. Thanks!!
 
Last edited:

ChrisMDL

New Member
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Roebling, NJ
Also another question. When I redo the supplies to each lav, do they both need hammer arrestors? I’ll buy the engineered ones, not just a vertical run of copper.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
What's the center to center distance on the two sinks in the lavatory? If 30" or less, they could share a single trap, allowing you to reuse what's there, if you want.

Otherwise, you drawing looks good to me. It'll be easier if you make the santees on the right 2x1-1/2" and reduce the loop and trap-arms to 1-1/2". [Edit: and less damaging to the studs to run 1-1/2" lines through them.] The two places you've labeled 90 elbow should be long turn 90s.

As for the water hammer arrestor, my understanding is that the benefit is most useful where you have a fast acting machine operated valve, like a washing machine, dishwasher, icemaker, etc. A human closing a lav faucet is slower. But it wouldn't hurt.

Cheers, Wayne
 
Last edited:

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
5,711
Reaction score
1,281
Points
113
Location
92346
thats a fine way! Looks like a lot of work but its fine. As for aresstors why? If you got hammer add them later. normaly Id say 98 percent dont need it
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
Does it really matter when using a sanitary tee for connecting only vents which way the sweep goes? I'm not aware of any code section that calls it out, but I may have missed it.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
You may have 'missed it" but our inspectors DID NOT and will reject a tee if it is not inverted.
I think there's two questions:

Does either main plumbing code require it? I'll look again, but a citation would help a lot.

Does it affect performance? I have trouble seeing how that's possible.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,991
Reaction score
3,774
Points
113
Location
IL
I think there's two questions:

Does either main plumbing code require it? I'll look again, but a citation would help a lot.

Does it affect performance? I have trouble seeing how that's possible.
I went looking in IPC, and did not even find where it specifies the direction for a sanitary tee used for drainage. Where is that? I figured that would be a good place to start to see what wording I might search for.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
You may have 'missed it" but our inspectors DID NOT and will reject a tee if it is not inverted.
P.S. I like your answer from 2008:

By convention, and to make inspectors happy, they are usually installed inverted, but as a practical matter air is a gas and thus does not need "sweep" fittings to help its flow.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
IPC 905.2, you can try to split hairs if you want but I was taught to always install it inverted and so are all plumbers.

https://up.codes/viewer/colorado/ipc-2018/chapter/9/vents#905.2

905.2 Grade Vent and branch vent pipes shall be so graded and connected as to drain back to the drainage pipe by gravity.

The only conclusion I draw from that is that if the horizontal vent had a reverse slope for some reason, then you'd have to install the san-tee in the normal orientation.

I was taught to install them inverted as well, but now I'm at the point in my education where I ask the question "why?" Is it that code requires it, or that it performs better, or just that it looks pleasingly symmetric?

Cheers, Wayne
 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
2,970
Reaction score
926
Points
113
The layout looks good to me too with all the suggested edits..

But I'm more concerned with all the Redacted bits.. What are you trying to hide? Seems suspicious this close to an election! /s
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,991
Reaction score
3,774
Points
113
Location
IL
The only conclusion I draw from that is that if the horizontal vent had a reverse slope for some reason, then you'd have to install the san-tee in the normal orientation.
Are you saying that the santee may be 88/92 degrees, and in UPC I think the horizontal vent pipe is supposed to tilt down toward the vented pipe. In IPC, the horizontal vent can go either way, as long as that way end leads to a drain, allowing a vent to follow an inverted V, perhaps under a peaked roof. Nope, I don't have chapter and verse.

I was taught to install them inverted as well, but now I'm at the point in my education where I ask the question "why?" Is it that code requires it, or that it performs better, or just that it looks pleasingly symmetric?

:pWhile one reason cited for UPC requiring a combo for a vent to a horizontal pipe is to make a snake coming down from the vent to go the right way, it is sometimes said that the combo makes you ready if you need to convert that vent to a drain pipe in the future. If that logic were applied to a vent pipe connecting to a santee, you might require the santee to be not inverted. :rolleyes:
 

James Henry

In the Trades
Messages
1,495
Reaction score
355
Points
83
Location
Billings, Montana.
Common sense would tell you that you wouldn't want to pipe a smoke stack like that. Same reasoning. If the santee were connected to a vent stack and not a stack vent then the right side up santee would be illegal because it does not follow the flow of the drain. perhaps the code was written to mean that the vent santee must follow the path of the drain it serves.
 

ChrisMDL

New Member
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Roebling, NJ
Thanks all for the great ideas and discussion. I further opened up the Sheetrock and I’m not sure if that changes my plan. For the vent loop you all were discussing can I just cut off that copper elbow circled in red, do a banded coupling there horizontally , and continue the vent as shown in white? How many inches off the floor does that need to be? Currently the bottom of that horizontal vent section is 39” above the rough subfloor

18700D33-73FF-4AAA-8FEF-F7007F99D607.jpeg
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
So what is the center to center distance on your two sinks? And where do those end up relative to the existing plumbing?

Vents combining or going horizontal is only supposed to happen at an elevation of at least 6" above the flood rim level of the fixtures served. So how high above the floor will your vanity top be? I'm unclear on how the 6" is to be measured (center of horizontal pipe? bottom of horizontal pipe?) and whether, in a remodel situation, it really matters if it's 3" or 6".

The studs with the horizontal pipes through them would benefit from stud shoes.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,655
Reaction score
1,463
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
OK, 34" spacing rules out a single common trap.

What's the vanity top height? If it's 33", you're definitely good to go with your original plan, as amended by the earlier discussion. You can replace the copper elbow with a plastic tee, with a shielded rubber coupling to the right of the tee (Fernco 3001-22 or Mission CK-22 for 2" plastic/cast iron to 2" copper).

If the vanity top is at 34", your vent center line is 6" above the flood rim, you could argue that's compliant.

If the vanity top is 35" or 36", then the question is whether it's worth raising the horizontal vent line for that extra 1-3" of height. Not sure what to advise you.

Cheers, Wayne

mission-ck22.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks