Considering a CSV..

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Michael Vincent

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Hey all,

I am interested in installing a CSV, but am nervous about the purchase as I am having a difficult time trying to determine if it will work in my home.
After living in my home for 3 yrs I'm not satisfied with the constant pressure changes that I experience when taking a shower. I learned that I can have constant pressure, and decided to find a way to upgrade.
I was first looking at a Grundfos SQE system, but after looking around the internet I found the CSV, and it looks like an interesting concept. As a bonus, I wouldn't feel so bad tearing out a perfectly good well pump/pressure tank out of my home just because I want city like pressure!

My house was built in 2016.

I have a 1/2hp 10GPM pump that is set at 82ft down in my pvt well. I don't know the brand, but I do know it's a submersible.

The pipe coming into my home from that is a black 1" polytubes series 100 pipe(got that off the side I can see).

That goes to a 20gallon fiberglass tank, 40-60 pressure switch, into a softener and out to the house.


I don't want anything to burst/break if I put a CSV1A in line with my existing tank.

What is that black pipe rated for?
How much pressure would the CSV end up building in that pipe given my well? Will it be safe?
Will that valve work with my existing setup retaining my 20G tank/pressure switch, etc?

Or, should I be biting the bullet and getting a Grundfos SQE constant pressure system?

Hopefully some on here could provide me with some opinions/options, etc.

thanks again,

Michael
 

Sarg

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I'm sure Mr. Austin ( AKA Valveman - shogun of cyclestopvalves ) will be on to provide experienced answers you can trust.
I just installed a CSV while replacing my Water Heater , pressure tank and well pump. The differences are I have my switch set at 30/50 and my well is at 200 feet with a 3/4 Gould pump. During showers now the CSV holds at 43 psi for the duration. Buying direct from cyclestopvalve.com was cheaper than from outside sources and we do not regret the expense.
 

JoeJee

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I installed one. I couldn’t tell much pressure change before in the house but the sprinkler varying would bug the crap out of me. To me it has been worth it. Current setup is 40/70 with valve at 65ish. 36 gal tank. 3/4 pump around 440ft down. Don’t know well or water depth. 6” well.

Not sure why house is at 40/70 but was like that when we moved in.

Edit: I was also worried about pipe in well and pressure. The CSV company is VERY helpful with questions.
 

Valveman

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"Shogun", Lol! A 1/2HP, 10 GPM pump can only build 100 PSI max. From that you can subtract the static water level to find out what pressure the underground pipe will see. With 20' to water in the well, the underground pipe will only see 90 PSI. The burst pressure of pipe is 2-5 times the rated pressure, so you will be good.
 

JoeJee

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Hired a local company to come out and check well and look it over. I will say he isn’t a fan of cycle stop valves. He had his list of reasons why: would get dirty and stick, make noise, to much heat, high pressure in lines. Anyway, I eventually told him I would look at all my options when the pump finally failed but so far I am good with the CSV.

That brings me to my point, he did a ground test on the windings and said I was out of spec and is on its way out but could last years more. He said I most likely have a 1/2-3/4 Franklin. Getting 7-10gpm from pump. Water level is about 80’ down but we have no way of knowing actual depth of well or pump since there isn’t any data. How do I double check the health of the pump? Is just keeping record of amp reading and ground test sufficient? How do I properly check for grounding? What should it be?
 

Reach4

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Did he give an ohms number?

A little electrical leakage to ground is not a big deal IMO.

Your pump might be good for another 20 years.
 

JoeJee

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Did he give an ohms number?

A little electrical leakage to ground is not a big deal IMO.

Your pump might be good for another 20 years.

Yes, he took an ohm test but I didn’t really catch the number. He did say there wasn’t a good way to tell if it is the wire and/or pump that is allowing the path to ground other than pulling the pump. The amp draw was 6.2-6.8 amps and he said it was within spec. Is there literature on what ohms are acceptable?
 

Reach4

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Yes, he took an ohm test but I didn’t really catch the number. He did say there wasn’t a good way to tell if it is the wire and/or pump that is allowing the path to ground other than pulling the pump. The amp draw was 6.2-6.8 amps and he said it was within spec. Is there literature on what ohms are acceptable?
Download the Franklin AIM manual. Lots of stuff in there, but I expect you will find the currents for the single phase motors no problem.
 

Valveman

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Hired a local company to come out and check well and look it over. I will say he isn’t a fan of cycle stop valves. He had his list of reasons why: would get dirty and stick, make noise, to much heat, high pressure in lines. Anyway, I eventually told him I would look at all my options when the pump finally failed but so far I am good with the CSV.

That brings me to my point, he did a ground test on the windings and said I was out of spec and is on its way out but could last years more. He said I most likely have a 1/2-3/4 Franklin. Getting 7-10gpm from pump. Water level is about 80’ down but we have no way of knowing actual depth of well or pump since there isn’t any data. How do I double check the health of the pump? Is just keeping record of amp reading and ground test sufficient? How do I properly check for grounding? What should it be?
I hope you didn't pay him as the guy has no idea what he is doing. If he doesn't understand that the Cycle Stop Valve has many benefits and makes pumps last much longer not shorter, he doesn't know enough about pumps to be in the pump business. The CSV is self flushing and doesn't "stick". You have had a CSV for a couple of years, do you hear any noise? No! The CSV makes your pump draw half of full amperage, so the CSV reduces heat, it doesn't cause heat. Your 1/2HP pump can only make about 90 PSI max backpressure, which isn't too much for even 100# pipe.

BECAUSE you have a Cycle Stop Valve your pump will last much longer than normal. I have a 1/2HP pump the same size and model that I installed in 1982. I put a Cycle Stop Valve on it in 1993. The only reason I was concerned for a while is that it ran for 11 years without a Cycle Stop Valve. But I guess after 40 years the CSV was installed before it was too late. You can expect your pump to still be running when that pump man is old and gone. If he was honest and knew anything about pumps I could appreciate him not liking Cycle Stop Valves for that reason, but not because they cause any failures.
 
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