Can I install a 2nd flr laundry room emergency floor drain that dumps into basement slop sink?

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DragonBallz

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Located in Massachusetts. The inspectors already told me I can’t terminate the drain to the outside of the house. I dont want to ask them about the basement slop sink and give them reason to mess with me.

A bunch of walls are already to the studs making it easy. The renovation is permitted but I’m planning on doing the floor drain after rough inspection to hide it.

Labor costs are through the roof and I dont want to pay a plumber more than I have to. A plumber is already going to do the regular rough-in work.
 

Kreemoweet

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I believe your inspector is mistaken. Any piping not connected to the sanitary drain system or water supply
is outside his/her jurisdiction. Surely you are entitled to dump buckets of water in your yard (as long as it
doesn't cause problems for your neighbors), and doing the same thing using a length of pipe should not
change that situation. It is routine to drain various things into utility sinks.
 

DragonBallz

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I believe your inspector is mistaken. Any piping not connected to the sanitary drain system or water supply
is outside his/her jurisdiction. Surely you are entitled to dump buckets of water in your yard (as long as it
doesn't cause problems for your neighbors), and doing the same thing using a length of pipe should not
change that situation. It is routine to drain various things into utility sinks.
I asked a building inspector, not plumbing inspector. I wonder if it has to do with weather sealing. For example, the laundry room would be cold in the winter because of the pipe going outside.

The only thing I can think of for the slop sink is that it may be a fire hazard? Same reason why they want us to use fire stop caulking.
 

Master Plumber Mark

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All you have to do is run a one inch PVC drain line down to the basement and just drop it into the
top of the laundry tub with an air gap and it will work fine...... we have done this often... and their is really no
code that I am aware of when it comes to just running a dry pipe up to a washing machine pan on the
floor.... This is basically like running a condensation drain line from a second floor furnace down to the
basement drain.... but yours will probably never have water in it.. It wont be an issue....

carry on
 

John Gayewski

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There are a lot of local jurisdictions who regulate dumping anything outside. There are places who won't let you collect rain water. Massachusetts is an odd place when it comes to building code of any kind, very strict. Floor drains are plumbing fixtures which also makes them part of the regulations.

That said dropping into a slop sink should be legal. If it's longer than 15 feet of pipe it needs a vent (if I remember right). But you really should consult a local plumber who is more familiar with local code.
 

Jeff H Young

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I hear Ma. is tough or at least that Boston is perhaps its the whole state . I know a young guy about 32 years old from there and he told me how strict it is . But in our code we often put the washer in a pan with 1 inch PVC drain to outside. I don't think dropping it in a utility sink would be a problem here , Sounds like your talking about a floor drain and I don't know if that would be allowed in your code or mine not going to look up my code since that's no help.
 

DragonBallz

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I hear Ma. is tough or at least that Boston is perhaps its the whole state . I know a young guy about 32 years old from there and he told me how strict it is . But in our code we often put the washer in a pan with 1 inch pvc drain to outside. I dont think dropping it in a utility sink would be a problem here , Sounds like your talking about a floor drain and I dont know if that would be allowed in your code or mine not going to look up my code since thats no help.
My issue is that if I do a floor drain, the building (not plumbing) inspector told me that it has to be connected to regular plumbing, with a trap and all. It can’t be going outside. That means I will need a trap primer. To me, that is all unnecessary money spent with another point of possible failure / leak.

I can see how a laundry pan will help with a leak from the washing machine, but not from a burst hose or whatever.
 

Jeff H Young

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I've never tried looking up Ma code or a Boston code if they have their own . The building inspector might even be wrong or even a plumbing inspector can be. They aren't always right. Did inspector say you needed a drain?
I would likely install the pan . and consider floor drain there are some other things you can do as well , solenoids that shut water off
 

Reach4

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But in our code we often put the washer in a pan with 1 inch pvc drain to outside. I dont think dropping it in a utility sink would be a problem here , Sounds like your talking about a floor drain and I dont know if that would be allowed in your code or mine not going to look up my code since thats no help.
I expect the incidence of freezing plays a big factor in places that allow/require stuff going outside, including T&P drains.
 

Jeff H Young

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It either meets code or doesn't. we can speculate why IPC says one thing UPC another and why NJ code has a opinion matching or conflicting with either. on any code. Or we can decide ourselves that this code makes no sense is wrong but either way we don't get to re write the code . they aren't always right is my observation . but are always the rules that govern us
 
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