Bradford white heat pump water heater

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CMB2018

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Gentlemen;; Bought and installed a bradford white Aerotherm water heater in august. It replaced my 1970's Vaughn stone steel electric water heater. The heatpump water heater has been working fine. A decent elec. savings over the old Vaughn. But, I noticed lately there is no discharge of water from the condensing line.

I have it installed in concrete 30x40basement with wood stove for basement heat. Could the air be dry enough that the condenser line will have no discharge?
I should also add, I run it in hybrid mode and there are no trouble codes showing.

I initially let the condenser drain run into a 5 gal. bucket. Mainly because I was curious how much water it produced.. I had to empty it several times. About the time I started heating with wood I never had to empty the bucket. I pulled the hose off completely from the tank and nothing comes out of the fitting on the side of the tank.
 
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denverag03

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(late reply) I've never noticed a ton coming out of mine but I haven't really looked that closely. If you take the cover off, you can see where the pan is underneath the coil. I suppose it's small enough that you'd never see as much as you do from an A/C coil.
 

jadnashua

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The indoor humidity levels in a typical building tends to be lower, sometimes LOTS lower in the winter, depending on how tight the house is, the ventilation, and the type of heating system. As long as the tank is producing the needed hot water, it's probably fine.

A relative humidity meter is fairly cheap. Note, cooler air of the winter can't hold as much moisture as it can if the air is warmer, so that will play into the absolute humidity, but maybe not change the relative humidity levels. IOW, 50% RH at 80-degrees doesn't have anywhere near the same amount of moisture in it as 50% at 60-degrees...at 60-degrees there's less absolute moisture in the air - colder air can't hold as much moisture as warmer air does.
 
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